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In Through Here

First of all today, I want to say Happy May Day.  I have discovered recently that today is the official first day of Spring in England, so this morning I was up before sunrise to watch the Morris Dancers of Melbourne dancing to welcome the sunrise, I think that is what it was.  We had an amazing sunrise, so that was brilliant.  I did take photos, and will show them to you tomorrow.

Today, it is back the Bluestone on St Kilda Road.

Entrance HallThis is the first entrance hall of the bluestone at the building that belongs to the Deaf Children Australia.  This is what you see when you first walk inside the main door.  I have shown you that door before.  In through the door you can see the main staircase.

To do this image, I actually did two.  There was no way to hold the door open, so my daughter held it open and stood on the far left, and then in the second image she stood on the step to keep it open.  I used a tripod so the only thing that changed was her.  I put the two images together and masked her out of the image.  I really wanted you to be able to see the view though the door.  It is quite impressive.

Staircase of the MainI have shown you bits of pieces of this staircase, but I wanted to show it as more of a whole as well.  It is a really grand staircase and creates quite an impressive entrance for the building.  I think the children and families who went there for the first time would have felt quite intimidated by this grandeur.  Though we now know that it didn’t continue all the way through the building.

When I was there last time I was told some interesting facts about the clock from Neil, so I am just going to cut and paste what he told me.

As mentioned the clock that is in the main part of the building is known as a ‘slave’ clock. There were several of them throughout the building at some stage. The master was located I believe near the laundry. Currently the master is at a repairer’s store in Glen Waverley, where the watch maker is awaiting our instructions to go ahead with the repairs. We have not been able to find the funds to do this.

When I started at DCA in 2000 the slave clock was operational. At some stage the power was disconnected or damaged and since then it has not run. I believe that it probably needs its master (like most of us do!) but not being a watch maker I really have no idea.

When you look at the two images above is hard to understand why the building is in need of restoration.  I am going to show you that at some point, and have shown a little, but when you walk around you can see the damage of time and see how things need to be fixed.

I have just mentioned the building needs restoration.  From what I have gathered, they are looking for around 12 millions dollars for this restoration.  The board for Deaf Children Australia have committed up to 6 million, but a lot more needs to be found.

The restoration doesn’t include just the building.  The goal is for the Deaf Children Australia (DCA) to become self sufficient and for the building to help, not just the deaf community, but many other organisations and communities who are living with disabilities.  The plans are fantastic, and as I continue to do this project I will let you know a lot more of those plans.

So please remember, if you would like to donate money toward the restoration then please Donate Here.

Photomatix Pro

On another note, I wanted to mention something about the two images up above.  They are both HDR images and I have processed them with Photomatix Pro, but I have used the latest version.  I don’t know why it never occurred to me to check to see if there were any updates.  If you have purchased it recently or in the last two years, then you may be eligible for a free upgrade.  Great deal, don’t you think.

I have some links for you.

The policy about upgrades

If you are eligible, the upgrade can be downloaded here.

Just one warning when you using the latest version, you seem to need to check the remove ghosts box every time you process an image.  Otherwise it is good.

64 Comments
  1. Reblogged this on necroarts.

    May 1, 2013
  2. What glorious shots,so many angles,colors and dimensions…beautiful 🙂

    May 1, 2013
    • Thank you, I quite like doing shots with lots of angles. 🙂

      May 1, 2013
  3. Beautiful, as ever.
    Aside from the lovliness of your work (more than enough in itself!), I feel like I’m learning something about Australia via your view of its architecture. How BRITISH the builders wanted their stamp to be! I wonder if there’s a more specifically Australian identity that finds expression in more contemporary buildings…this may be a well-trod topic, but I’m a dummy back where it’s still April (:
    Anyway – thanks, as usual for yr stunning pics, Leanne !

    May 1, 2013
    • I think you have hit the nail on the head. I think Australians have always had trouble identifying ourselves as Australian. It is quite extraordinary. They clung onto England for so long, now they cling to anywhere but here. Just look at our iconic buildings today and ask how many of them were actually designed by Australians? The answer would be, not many. It is sad really.
      Thanks Claire, you have got me thinking.

      May 1, 2013
      • We have the same historical and architectural “shadow” in Canada. We are still trying to sort out our true identity: British? French? Cultural mosaic? With great pride, Canada has gone on to produce world-class design and art – thanks to colleges and universities such as Ryerson, the Ontario College of Art and others.
        We have a long way to go though before we truly become “ourselves”.

        May 1, 2013
      • Must be a colony thing, I think for us is that we started as a penal colony, and we struggle with that identity. It is a strange thing. We have many Australians that have done some fantastic things, but we usually lose them because we don’t support them enough. It is a funny thing. Interesting that Canada suffers from the same thing.

        May 1, 2013
      • Interesting, because England itself has become so multi-cultural. Ha! Half the Empire came home to roost, and although I’m sure there are nationalists tearing their hair out, it’s prettty much of a lost cause. Identity there is quite fluid, as the former colonies have triumphed in making their presence felt.
        History is a strange process – in the US, there are plenty of descendents of Britain’s deported petty crooks – they were sent here before Australia was established. And they take a certain pride in that identity: everyone’s ancestor had been in an English jail “for stealing a loaf of bread”. But there’s a great deal of truth to that, since most of the offenses (for you and us) WERE crimes of poverty.
        Anyway, many who were sent here were indentured servants who labored beside enslaved Africans and were promised land after seven years.
        Well, they didn’t get it – and so became a rebellious sub-culture that now imports itself internationally via country music, step-dancing, etc – a blend of English, Irish, Welsh and African-American blues music.
        Okay, Big Mouth O’Brien signing off…

        P.S. The real point in this context is the great beauty AND usefulness of your photos, Leanne – not my big mouth !

        May 1, 2013
      • So from what I have worked out, Australia got the convicts because of the American Revolution, the Americans said, we don’t want your criminals anymore, then the Brits remembered this country of Terra Nullis, that some guy called Captain had “discovered” in 1770 and since there was “no one” living here, they thought, ah perfect place to send out crooks, so they started coming in 1788. Lovely don’t you think. Everyone wants to think that they are descendents here as well, which is silly because they were still criminals, and apparently only criminals who had multiple convictions were sent here. It was very rare for someone who had only stolen one loaf of bread to be sent here. They may have only stolen one loaf of bread at the time, but it was how many other times they had been caught stealing that one loaf of bread.
        The convicts sent here weren’t promised land, well not that I know of, but they were meant to be free, but they had to find their own way back to England, so, as you can imagine, most stayed. I am not sure what we think of ourselves, but I think we are proud of our multi-culturalism, well most of us are. I love the food here and the architecture is amazing. I also think there is a beauty in the country that is like other places, and then some places it is unique, it is nice.
        I bet you weren’t expecting a history lesson, but there you have it. Thank you Claire, I love what you said about my photos as well.

        May 1, 2013
  4. It’s also the first official day of Spring in Scandinavia. Happy May Day to you too.
    Two brilliant shots again … of course. Love how you have caught the light both through the window and the door … in the last photo.
    The top photo is my favorite – because I love doors .. and especially if they are open – because that wants me to go in and … look around. That light you caught is the entrance is amazing. So filled with warmth and welcoming.

    May 1, 2013
    • I had never heard of May day before, so it is great to hear you talking about it as well.
      Thank you, I do quite like these images, and I tried to be careful with how they were processed. I am really happy with how they came out.

      May 1, 2013
      • My yesterday post about how we celebrate the last day of winter. In Lund yesterday …. the police had their hands full already in the afternoon, because … of too much alcohol again. Worst ever they said … and when I took the train home after my hospital visit … it the train was packed with youth that was going to celebrate the Spring. Big event in Sweden – any good reason for a good “piss up” *smile

        May 1, 2013
      • Love the last bit, I can relate. We don’t celebrate the changes of season here, probably because it isn’t a big change. I remember the time we were in Denmark and after winter, it was in April, we went to the local park one day when the weather was good and it was our first experience of a spring fever, the place was alive as we had never seen it. That doesn’t really happen, there a very gradual change in between seasons.

        May 1, 2013
      • We celebrate anything … every season we have some national event to celebrate and drink to. Next one .. Midsummer. *smile – you used the right word – we Scandinavians have spring fever … summer fever … autumn fever .. and winter fever. *smile

        May 1, 2013
  5. Jack Brewis #

    Stunning Leanne.

    May 1, 2013
  6. Happy May Day to you too…here (Italy) it’s a celebration of the worker’s movement…labor day. I loved those photos (I’m attracted to windows, doors and staircases so this was a boon for me!) and hope the building can be restored without losing it’s beauty…the general plan looks well thought out. Can’t wait to see your future articles about this fascinating place. Thanks.

    May 1, 2013
    • Thank you, Labour day, we have that in March. I hope so as well, I think the building is listed, so they will have to be careful with the restoration. I hope you enjoy the future posts, I am looking forward to when the work actually starts.

      May 1, 2013
      • Funny here March (the 21st) is considered the first day of spring…I’m sure I’ll enjoy them! Cheers!

        May 1, 2013
      • the first of March is the first day of Autumn here,
        Thanks

        May 1, 2013
      • Wonderful world we live in!

        May 1, 2013
      • 🙂

        May 1, 2013
  7. Love that etched glass on the front door, and the way you processed the image. Someday, maybe I’ll learn how to do that…when there’s time.
    (Ok, probably not, but I can still enjoy yours!)

    May 1, 2013
    • You will get time, she will go to school eventually and then you will have so much time. The etched glass is really gorgeous and they love it in the building, so they do everything they can to protect it.

      May 1, 2013
  8. As always , very good capture of light.

    May 1, 2013
  9. Beautiful pictures Leanne. I walk around Vegas, places like this must be here. I walk on…

    May 1, 2013
    • I wish I could say I knew, but alas, I don’t, maybe in a place like Vegas you just need to find a different way, maybe the greed, the desperation, I don’t know, it must be an interesting city, so unique in many ways.

      May 1, 2013
  10. Wow I love the second staircase photo, with the colours of the stained glass at the top.

    May 1, 2013
    • Thank you I am really happy with that one as well. It is a lovely staircase and the stained glass window at the top, is like the icing on the cake.

      May 1, 2013
  11. 1annecasey #

    Beautiful images – fabulous lighting.

    May 1, 2013
  12. Genius re: the first image, Leanne, absolute genius!

    I hope (and pray) they receive enough to do the renovation properly, after reading the ‘new’ goals to include helping those with other disabilities. Goodness and kindness must be rewarded, as it seems there is a definite waning of both these days!

    May 1, 2013
    • I think you are right, it is wonderful what they are trying to do and they should be rewarded in some way, for example being able to raise the money to do that. I hope so. Thanks 1000

      May 2, 2013
      • Keep going at it, Leanne…show as many images as you can, especially the parts which need serious renovation. The more who know, the more will be donated…and you have quite a following over there!

        May 2, 2013
      • Yes, I that is true. I haven’t devoted enough time to it, but I have more now and really want to start getting stuck into it. It is a very interesting project and not one that I have really done before.

        May 2, 2013
      • And I know you’ll not only do it well, but you’ll also have a lot of fun, Leanne!

        May 3, 2013
      • So much faith, thank you, I hope so.

        May 3, 2013
  13. gorgeous images as always! such a grand entrance and stairway…I’m sure it impressed the parents but intimidated the children…

    May 1, 2013
    • Yes, I think you are right Heather. The children would have been terrified I think, especially the ones that had not learned how to sign and there was no way of communicating to them where they going. I really feel sorry for them. I know they weren’t going somewhere horrible. I am off track, sorry. Thank you Heather.

      May 2, 2013
  14. The composition and light of the first photo is stunning. It invites us right in!

    The historical comments are interesting, too. My son and his wife are preparing to move to Gladstone AU next month (she has a job at the LNG plant that is being built there), so I see a trip in our future!

    May 2, 2013
    • I have never been there, but it looks like it is located in a great part of the country. I am a long way away. But you will have to come and visit them and take a look around, fantastic.
      Thank you Marilyn, that is great. I am rather happy with how it came out.

      May 2, 2013
  15. Wow! Really interesting blog! You work so hard on your photos and it really shows! It’s amazing how much work gets put into it isn’t it? Love the first one the most I think, I really glad you were able to get a shot of it with the door open 🙂 Glad your daughter was there to help! Can’t wait to see more shots of this gorgeous building!

    May 2, 2013
    • Thank you Amanda, I feel like sometimes everything is about this blog, and what I am going to do on it and where I will go with it.
      Yes, have Briony there was fantastic, she did a great job. I think I need to go back, I should start trying to get more images that show the damage of time and what needs to be fixed.

      May 2, 2013
      • I know how you feel 🙂 I think that sounds great! I can’t wait to see what you come up with 😀 I’m always excited about your blogs though lol

        May 2, 2013
      • Thanks Amanda, am working on some new stuff now, today post should be fun, haha, well I hope so. 🙂

        May 2, 2013
  16. Your colors are beautiful

    May 2, 2013
  17. Pat #

    Beautiful work!

    May 2, 2013
  18. Beautiful photos. Just curious, I noticed on the top etched panes of the doors it has sayings I was trying to make out. It looks like one says God is Light and the other appears to be God is Love but I’m not sure. Anyway, I really like the etched glass, the stained glass and the staircase. Huh, guess that’s pretty much all of it! 🙂

    May 2, 2013
    • Yes, pretty much, I think what you think it says is right. I have taken more notice, but I can’t quite remember now. Thanks

      May 2, 2013
  19. I’m catching up, and “in through here” literally drew me me through the door. It looks like magic could happen once you step across the threshold – and in that way the second photo appeals, but the first I love how you have elegantly combined the elements from the palms through the half open door upwards 🙂

    May 2, 2013
    • Thank you EllaDee, I love what you have said about, I like how you have made me think about it some more. 🙂

      May 2, 2013
  20. Knowing that your daughter is “there” in the first shot lends it a whole new level of spookiness. Brilliantly done, by the way. Both shots are so atmospheric you can almost smell them.

    May 3, 2013
    • That smell of mustiness from a building that has problems with dampness, interesting idea Richard. Thank you.

      May 3, 2013
  21. Love the door. So phenomenal!

    May 3, 2013
    • Thank you, it is pretty amazing, even more so when you think that the glass in the doors is all original, pretty amazing in a school.

      May 3, 2013
  22. I don’t want to prejudice my comment here and haven’t really read the posts above just to stay neutral and not wishing to cause unintentional offence. As a proud English person I had forgotten that ‘May day’ had passed, though we celebrate it on the 1st Monday in May rather than the 1st of the month. Here in the UK we are almost forced to be ashamed about our past both bad and good and days such as May Day and Saint Georges days are ignored while every other nation is celebrated. Thank you to our friends and indeed (some of our) descendants in the southern hemisphere.

    May 3, 2013
    • It is an interesting that things in cultures, like May Day get celebrated in the colonies more, as the people in their new countries hang onto old customs long after they are forgotten in the homeland, I hope I have explained that properly. We see it with all sorts of cultures here. Though having said that, I had not heard of May Day before last Tuesday.

      May 3, 2013
      • Seriously you have explained it perfectly and I didn’t want to use the word ‘colonie’ but from my understanding many of our traditions that have long since been since banished thrive fully in the ‘colonies’ proudly. I thank you for bringing something I as an English person regard as quaint and forgotten back to my attention 🙂

        May 3, 2013
      • You are very welcome and I suppose the word we are meant to use these days is Commonwealth or something like that, but seriously we are a colony of Mother England. Haha. 🙂

        May 3, 2013

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