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Before They Lay Me Down to Sleep

Last weekend up ended up very busy, and I didn’t get a chance to head over to the Bluestone that belongs to Deaf Children Australia.  I am hoping this weekend I will get a better chance.  So today I have more images for you from the inside.  Today I thought we might have a look at the boys dormitory.

The View Out the WindowImagine standing up next to your bed and looking out the window.  This is one of the views out of the window.  It would be a silent view, no birds would be heard or rustle of leaves.  Imagine being deaf, standing at this window looking out and dreaming you were out there.  No noises would affect you, the sounds of what was going on around you wouldn’t be a problem, you wouldn’t be able to hear them.  Nothing to disturb your thoughts.

I like this view, it gives you a nice look of the outside of the building.

Staring Up the CeilingI know this is a strange image, but I tried to do it from the point of view of lying in the bed, well, if there was a bed there.  Imagine lying on the bed and staring straight up.

To make this image seem as real as possible, as it would have for the boys that slept looking up at this ceiling, I have removed all signs of technology.  There were electric lights, sprinklers and other things in the ceiling.  Boys sleeping in this room over 100 years ago would not have had any of those things to look at.

Boys Dormitory

This is part of the boys dormitory as well.  From my position you would have been able to see some beds, but you also would have been able to see out into that corridor.  In that corridor were some offices, I believe, of the people looking after the children.  Also, though to the other end was the girls dormitory.  How many boys stood here, or around here, trying to work out how to get to the girls.

You can tell from this image that you can’t see straight into the girls dormitory, their door was around the corner.  Interesting, the separation of the sexes.

Stories, Tales, Poetry

After my post last week quite a few suggested the idea of doing some fairy tales, or writing short stories to go with the images.  I am also open to the idea of poems as well.  I know that a lot of writers follow my blog, so how about you go through the photos that I have posted from the bluestone that belongs to Deaf Children Australia and write something in response to what you see?

I will put them or links to them on my Wednesday posts for others to see.  Just let me know.

If you would just like to see the building being restored then you can donate money toward the restoration by Donating Here.

71 Comments
  1. The story additions are a great idea.

    May 15, 2013
  2. It’s a little intimidating with the big ceilings… I can see a little Pip, with his tin in hand asking cook “Please Sir, may I have some more….”

    May 15, 2013
    • Yes, I have to agree, it is a big a place for small people.

      May 15, 2013
  3. Bob #

    Interesting restoration. Are the colors true to the original interior and howmuch renovation do they have left? Just curious. They seem to be doing a godd job with the restoration.

    May 15, 2013
    • The restorations haven’t started yet, the images in this post show it well, but these rooms are not used for much at the moment. There are other areas where the damage is more pronounced.

      May 15, 2013
      • Bob #

        Thanks for the information and the post.

        May 15, 2013
  4. I like the third photo. 🙂

    May 15, 2013
    • Thank you, that is wonderful. 🙂

      May 15, 2013
  5. I love the upside down window/bed perspective picture! Very clever!

    May 15, 2013
    • LOL, it is pretty crazy, I like it too, thank Matthew

      May 15, 2013
  6. Absolutely brilliant! I was right there! And, funny thing is, it made me think of a short story, the seeds of an idea for one. If it comes to me, I will write it up and send it to you.

    May 15, 2013
    • Yes, please do, that would be brilliant, if you let me know what photos to accompany it, I will make sure I get some to go with your story. Thank you Nia.

      May 15, 2013
  7. 1annecasey #

    Some great ideas here. I love your different perspectives with the photos, and your explanation of why you shot them like this. : )))

    May 15, 2013
    • That’s great to hear Anne, I thought people might think I was crazy.

      May 15, 2013
      • 1annecasey #

        Silly!! : )))

        May 15, 2013
  8. Vivid pictures of silence.

    May 15, 2013
  9. Love that second photo! And a brilliant idea asking writers to use these pictures (and their mates) as a prompt!

    May 15, 2013
    • Thank you, I hope so, and I hope some of them do it, could be really interesting.

      May 15, 2013
      • The links will be on today’s post??

        May 15, 2013
      • Thank you

        May 15, 2013
  10. Reblogged this on Bastet and Sekhmet and commented:
    A poem or a tale…could be interesting to use one of the bluestone photos that belong to Deaf Children Australia for an interesting prompt…read more here!!!

    May 15, 2013
  11. I can see a small, dreamy child, gazing out that window to the grounds…the Outside is so close at hand, but unreachable… The view from the bed would be intimidating for a Small One in the dark, all that Emptiness over his head…
    Great post 🙂

    May 15, 2013
    • It is an interesting way of helping people to engage with the building. I quite enjoy doing it as well. I agree about the view from the bed, it would be scary and filled with nightmares.
      Thank you.

      May 15, 2013
  12. Love the ceiling shot with the windows … I would have liked a little bit lighter – but I know where you’re coming from … *smile

    May 15, 2013
  13. lucywilliamspoetry #

    Hi, I am going to put a poem on my blog called Bluestone. It is about the deaf children Australia using you photos. Let me know what you think.

    May 15, 2013
    • Thank you Lucy, I just read it, I will put up a link to it next week.

      May 16, 2013
  14. lucywilliamspoetry #

    http://lucywilliamspoetry.wordpress.com/2013/05/15/bluestone/ This is the link.

    May 15, 2013
  15. I love this idea!! I will write you a little something. I love the first photo. It’s a stolen moment that sooo feeds the words in my little head. 🙂

    May 15, 2013
    • That is fantastic, let me know when you do. I had hoped this would inspire people to write. Thank you

      May 16, 2013
  16. What great pictures, and how fun to write stories to go with the pictures. Leanne, you are brilliant. BTW I recommended you as a WordPress consultant or teacher – whatever for their Photography 101 course they are offering. They asked for contributor recommendations, and several others recommended you as well.

    May 16, 2013
    • Thank you Marsha, a few people suggested it last week, and I thought, lets go with it. I hope people will do it.
      Thank you Marsha, I wonder why they are doing that? Interesting idea.

      May 16, 2013
  17. I love your pics they are so beautiful and inspirational. Thank you for sharing 🙂

    May 16, 2013
    • What a wonderful thing to say, thank you so much.

      May 16, 2013
  18. Sonel #

    Stunning architecture and photo’s Leanne! You don’t want to hear my stories though…it would only be about ghosts or weird horror stuff…LOL! Thanks for sharing. 🙂 *hugs*

    May 16, 2013
    • Thank you, and why wouldn’t we like to see them, they sound like the type of stuff that would be perfect for stories of the basement. Apparently the kids who lived there would tell each ghost stories at night and then dare one another to go down to the basement. The basement was obviously considered the scariest part of the building. I will put up some photos of it soon for you. 🙂

      May 16, 2013
      • Sonel #

        Oh yes, I like those “basement” stories. 😆 I am a huge fan of Stephen King and Dean R Koontz so that should tell you a lot..hehehe. I would have been one of those kids and also the one telling the stories. LOL!
        Thanks hon, I can’t wait to see them! You have such a unique way of seeing things and photographing them. 🙂

        May 16, 2013
      • That is such a lovely thing to say, thank you. I always find comments like these very encouraging. I will have to see what I can do about that basement now. 🙂

        May 16, 2013
      • Sonel #

        You are very welcome Leanne and I am glad you do, not that you need it as your photo’s are really inspiring and beautiful. Thanks, I know I will love it. 😆

        May 16, 2013
      • Thank you, glad you found my blog.

        May 16, 2013
      • Sonel #

        I am glad too hon. 🙂 *hugs*

        May 16, 2013
      • 🙂

        May 16, 2013
      • Sonel #

        😀

        May 16, 2013
  19. Dear Leanne,

    Forgive me for my inappropriate sense of humor, but I have to tell you the story your second picture reminded me about.

    In the summer of 2010 my husband and I were visiting Tate Modern, a modern art gallery in London, UK. It was our second hour of being there, so our pace began slowing down and our perception of modern art began blurring. We were already on level 4, when I stopped in front of an object which looked like a regular air vent, while a sign above it read “Acrylic Composition In Gray #6.”

    I carefully examined the object. True, it was gray. Was it acrylic? I wasn’t sure. Also, where were the first five? Nothing else in the room had numbers assigned to it. Confused, I looked at the vent-looking object #6 more carefully. It could have been acrylic, I thought. As for the look, who knows, this could be what modern art is all about — ordinary things in their everyday environment? After all, didn’t Andy Warhol’s paint a can of Campbell’s soup?

    Now I was looking at the vent with considerable respect and admiration. Who was to say that this vent would not be a beginning of something new in art? I turned around to share my musings with my husband, and spotted him two yards to my left – carefully examining a middle-sized platter with something mushy in the middle.

    “Did you see the composition #6?” I said, approaching him.

    “I’m looking at it right now.” He replied.

    “What do you mean?” I said. “It’s right there!” And I pointed to the spot where I spent the last three minutes.

    “No, that’s just the sign.” My husband said. “I first thought so, too, but then I realized that they must’ve moved the composition but forgot about the sign. That thing is just an air vent.”

    I stared at the platter. It was acrylic. It was gray, too — dark gray, I’d say. As for its mushy content, I didn’t want to think about that. Besides, what was the point? My husband was obviously right. There it was, “Acrylic Composition In Gray #6.” The first five, I decided, must’ve had different mushy stuff, so tomorrow it could be called “Composition #7” or something like that.

    I turned back to the air vent. Another woman was carefully looking it over, up and down. At first, she didn’t look very impressed, but as her observations continued, she began looking more and more thoughtful – just like me several minutes ago.

    “Should we tell her where the composition actually is?” I said to my husband.

    “No,” He winked, “Everybody has her own vision or art.”

    May 16, 2013
    • Hahaha, that is going to crack me up all day, thank you so much for that story. Though I have to admit, I probably would do the same thing. I wonder if they had a camera and were watching people’s reaction to the vent.
      I have tears in my eyes now, what a great start to my morning, thank you for taking the time to write it out for me.

      May 16, 2013
  20. certainly an impressive building…I do think it might be the type of building that could intimidate small children in certain areas though…as least I think it would have me as a small child…poems and stories are an interesting idea, I’m not a writer, it takes me forever to write something but I do enjoy it when I have the time…

    May 16, 2013
    • Well Heather, if you find the time and want to write something, I would love to read it.
      I think it must have been terrifying for new students, especially for 5 or 6 year olds, and even more so for students who came with no language what so ever.

      May 16, 2013
  21. Pat #

    I love the last shot.

    May 16, 2013
    • Thanks Pat, I had to do so much work in that one, that I am so glad that you like it.

      May 16, 2013
  22. Great photography. You capture the vastness of the place. Thanks for sharing.

    May 16, 2013
  23. interesting ideas for the poems… I am up to day 297 so some fresh inspiration will be good 🙂

    May 17, 2013
    • That is great Dawn, please let me know if you do one. I would like to do something on my blog for everyone that does.

      May 17, 2013
  24. Dear Leanne,

    A couple of days ago, I sent you a little story about an air vent in Tate Modern. You’re welcome to use it if you wish. However, I’d like to use it (plus something else along the same lines) for my blog, too. Would you allow me to copy your picture to illustrate my story? Obviously, I’ll indicate who took the picture.

    May 17, 2013
    • I saw your story, it was fantastic, and yes, you can borrow one of my images, let me know when you do so I can make sure I see it.

      May 17, 2013
      • Will do. One thing, though. How do you want me to show it to you? By email? I mean, I cannot post something with images in your comment box, right?

        May 18, 2013
      • No you can’t do that, haha. 🙂 but you could comment with a link to the link, or you can email me the link. Though more people might go to it if you put it as a comment because they will see it too. I look forward to it. Everytime I think I think of the story I start laughing.

        May 18, 2013
      • Oh, I thought that you wanted to see it BEFORE I publish it — to make sure that you picture is not distorted (actually, if you don’t mind, I’ll cut the windows a little, since it is a rather long picture; also, that way the the ceiling will look more like the wall, and I need that for my story).
        Anyway, I got it now. I’ll post my story over the weekend (unlike the window, the story will be a little longer :). Thanks again!

        May 18, 2013
      • Oh no, I am happy to see it after you have done it and published it. No problems with that. 🙂

        May 18, 2013
  25. Dear Leanne,

    Here’s my story: http://wp.me/p2DEsJ-mx
    (It is very close to what you’ve already seen, although I did some editing.)
    Thank you for triggering my memory 🙂

    Svetlana

    May 20, 2013
    • Thank you Svetlana, I will put a link to it on my post on Wednesday so others can read it, there have been a few which is wonderful.

      May 20, 2013
  26. Reblogged this on ordyme and commented:
    before side

    May 20, 2013
  27. That second image is genius, Leanne! Removing all the things we take for granted, and pondering what would go through a young deaf boy’s mind as he unconsciously studied the windows and the architecture…absolutely a wonderful ‘other’ point of view!

    It’s my opinion that little stories or poems enhance the image, and what the view takes with them…and sometimes, what we think might not really work, has a profound influence on someone else. Words…very important, even if only a few.

    May 21, 2013
    • Thank you 1000, it is a little strange and I thought people would think I was crazy, but nearly everyone seems to have got it, so that great.
      I have had a few people who have written stuff, so I will put links to their work tomorrow when I next do a post about it. It is great to see that the work engages people.

      May 21, 2013

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