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Weekend Wanderings – Greening of Lake Albacutya

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Back in January I came to the Mallee and I went out to take photos at Lake Albacutya after fires had ripped through the parks and destroyed a lot of bushland.  I did a post on it back then, Weekend Wanderings – A Burnt Country. You should take a look at those photos first, if it isn’t too late.  Today I had an opportunity to go out and visit the area again and my guide was, again, Jonesy.

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The weather was horrible, and gall force winds were blowing icy winds.  We drove around and I was reminded of what the area looked like back in January, and how trees, like the one above were.  It is a harsh slap of reality really.  This tree was about a metre and a half across, so very old, and now very much gone.  The whole inside of it was burned.  I have other photos of it in the gallery and you can see how the whole part of the bottom was burned out.  It is a very hollow tree now.

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There is something in this image, I don’t want to give it away, see if you can find it, hint we saw a lot of them as we were driving around.

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Flowers are starting to flower.  It was so nice to see some colour there.  Of course there is a lot of green, lots and lots of green.  I can’t wait to go back in the spring and see the wild flowers.

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This is a Wattle seedling, and they are growing everywhere, apparently they are one of the first things to grow back after a fire.

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It was so lovely seeing all the trees regenerating as we were there. You could see the new shoots coming up from the bottom of the Mallee gum trees. It still looks like a bomb site, or somewhere where fires have been, but with green grass growing all over the ground, and then the regeneration shows the life is returning, or perhaps continuing.

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Jonesy took us to where his retreat had been burned out, and we had a look around, but I am happy to report that he has started to rebuild, and we enjoyed a coffee made in the bush kitchen, and around a warm fire.  It was great, though somewhat weird, sitting enjoying the warmth of the fire, knowing the reason we were where we were because of a fire. Jonesy has called his new place Lucky Pines, in honour of the pine trees that didn’t burn in the fire.

It was great to visit the place again, and I was shown some new places and got some great photos, they will have to wait until another day.  I do have more photos for you today to take a look at.  I hope your weekend is going well and has included lots of wanderings.  I have done so much in the last few days I am a bit worn out.

 

 

72 Comments
  1. Wonderful pics Leanne .. Great to see the place regenerating. How good is nature:)

    June 29, 2014
    • Nature is wonderful, just incredible, in 5 to 10 years there will be almost no sign that a fire went through there. Thank you Julie.

      June 29, 2014
  2. Beautiful pictures of life returning and continuing in a burnt place. Nature is remarkable in that way. I’m sure it will be even better in the spring!

    June 29, 2014
    • Thank you Tiny, it was so amazing being back after 6 months. It is truly remarkable watching things springing up and yes, spring should be fantastic, I can’t wait to see it.

      June 29, 2014
  3. I’m anxious to be able to hike again in Oak Creek canyon that burned last month. The canyon is closed now because of monsoon rains with potential mudslides and falling debris. The most popular trail, West Fork, is rumored not to be open to the public until next March. I would love to be able to photograph the regeneration! I really enjoyed seeing your photos, great contrast of dead and alive!

    Tamara

    June 29, 2014
    • It was a while here before many parts were open again, and even now there are signs everywhere telling you to be careful of falling limbs, or trees, which is why it was closed for so long in the first place, they were worried, the trees would come down. I guess it is good that it is closed, and I am sure you will be back in there before you know it Tamara.

      June 29, 2014
  4. maravilhoso!!!

    June 29, 2014
  5. Hi Leanne
    My new daughter in law (from Maldon, Victoria) is busy enjoying Britain’s blossoming summer but I will show her your latest pix. I know it will bring a shine to her eye.
    It really is amazing how the countyside recovers isn’t it. Of course that is not an excuse for doing bad things to it but I feel Mother Nature will last longer than we do.
    Nice pix again, as always. Your simple enthusiasm inspires me.
    Keep going
    Keep your eyes open and a camera handy.
    (By the way I couldn’t find anything hiding in those trees – looked for a koala But couldn’t see one)

    June 29, 2014
    • It really is David, in a few years will be hard to tell it ever happened. It is, of course, actually quite good for the bushland, and the bush in Australia has adapted to it a lot over thousands of years, the Aborigines here used to burn it all the time, so they could hunt.
      Thank you so much, I will keep going, hopefully back in Spring, and camera always ready.
      There is a Kangaroo in the middle of the photo, sort of behind the trees, in a gap. Take another look.

      June 29, 2014
  6. Cynthia #

    Especially loved the yellow flowers. It was quite eye-opening to compare these images with your images from back in January.

    June 29, 2014
    • It is amazing how much has changed in 6 months and how much hasn’t. Thanks Cynthia.

      June 29, 2014
  7. fantastic as always. So good to see it regenerate. I love the third one down. It has a slightly surreal look and the campfire one looks like a painting!! Bare trees waving to the sky. Like the phoenix arising from the flames and so life begins again from the ashes.

    June 29, 2014
    • You have such a great imagination, I just love it Cybele. Thank you so much, I really enjoyed seeing how life was coming back after the fires, both the flora and fauna.

      June 29, 2014
  8. Artful revisit, and I hope that you will continue to show its return to life.

    June 29, 2014
    • thank you, I plan too, so definitely will get some more photos in the years to come I hope.

      June 29, 2014
  9. Thanks for the return trip.Glad the rebuild is under way.

    June 29, 2014
    • My pleasure Robert, I really enjoyed seeing the life returning after such devastation.

      June 29, 2014
  10. Jackie Saulmon Ramirez #

    Black images against the sky are beautiful and the flowers bring hope! Fires, as devastating as they are, do bring about new growth. Seeds that were choked out by weeds will have a chance to germinate and sprout. The undergrowth burns quicker than trees to clear out brush. Even though trees may be scorched, they do grow back better than before. The old, dried out trees simply burn up to make room for healthier sprouts.

    June 29, 2014
    • That is so true, and really the way you have to look at it, and I know the animals are scared and traumatised for a while, but I think they recover too. The worse thing is that because of the way our bushlands are managed now, when there is a fire it is really horrific and major. The people who look after them won’t allow the fuel that is lying on the grounds to be taken away, and they don’t burn it off themselves, therefore when there is a fire, it is big, very big. We have to stop thinking we can control everything. Thanks Jackie.

      June 29, 2014
      • Jackie Saulmon Ramirez #

        Here in the U.S. many states allow controlled burns to remove that dangerous undergrowth so when it is dry and the possibility of natural (or man made) risk rises, it’s less likely to get out of control or spread that far. (My stepdad was a fireman and he taught me a lot.) Last year out west there were several firefighters were lost in a major fire, though.

        June 29, 2014
      • They do as much as they can here, but the problem is the parks are too large, there are hectares and hectares of it, that is part of the problem as well.

        June 29, 2014
  11. Oh my gosh beautiful photos! That second one is a favorite of mine! Hugz Lisa and Bear

    June 29, 2014
  12. Great series, Leanne! You and the family have a great week ahead! Take care. 🙂

    June 29, 2014
    • Thank you Fabio, you have a great week too.

      June 29, 2014
  13. Wonderful moody broody storm clouds. Tons of ambiance!

    June 29, 2014
    • Thank you Marilyn, I loved the clouds.

      June 29, 2014
  14. Leanne…wonderful pics and it’s sounds like you’re having a great time in spite of the cold weather.
    Lovely to see everything regenerating and the contrasts of burnt out against the new growth.
    Think I see a roo in there…above the stump…running away?

    June 29, 2014
    • Thanks Robyn, I have been having a good time though it has been very cold. The wind is so bad, have you had that?
      It has been good to see what has happened since, I really want to go back in spring.
      You do see a roo, we saw so many of them as we were driving around.

      June 29, 2014
      • Yes the roos are out for the green pick…whatever they can get.
        It’s snowing near Bathurst and freezing!!
        Glad you’ve been having a good time 🙂

        June 29, 2014
      • There is heaps for them to get now.
        Oh wow, I wish it were snowing here, it is certainly cold enough.
        It has been really good, I have to say. I finally got some stars tonight.

        June 29, 2014
      • Glad you got your stars Leanne… Does it ever snow there?

        June 29, 2014
      • I did, I put one up on Facebook, did you see it. I got quite a few last night, so happy.

        June 30, 2014
      • Morning 🙂
        Thats great Leanne!
        I’m not on fb presently. Decided with my back that was one less thing.. You know.
        Can’t wait to see what you’ve found!

        June 30, 2014
      • Good morning to you, the sun is getting to rise here.
        That makes sense Robyn, I have taken so many photos over the last 5 days that I am almost photoed out, though I am sure I will get over it quickly.
        Thanks, are you back home now?

        June 30, 2014
      • Lol.. Yes you will 🙂 look forward to seeing some 🙂
        No, not home yet, back to the Chiro today.
        Enjoy your morning sunshine. You home yet?

        June 30, 2014
      • It has gone all cloudy and I think it is going to be raining when we get back, oh well.
        Oh okay, well I hope you can get back before the snow disappears. 🙂

        June 30, 2014
      • 🙂

        June 30, 2014
  15. Really great photos Leeanne. They make me realise and appreciate how amazing the australian landscape is…..havingbeen away from itfor a month. : )

    June 29, 2014
    • Thank you Trees, it is amazing. Will you be back soon?

      June 29, 2014
      • this week…seems like I’ve missed the wild weather : )

        June 30, 2014
      • Yes, lucky you, the weather has been horrible, very wintery, very windy and very cold.

        June 30, 2014
  16. It’s amazing how nature regenerates – new life springs out of no where!

    June 29, 2014
    • It is Anica, and how the bush adapts to it.

      June 29, 2014
  17. poppytump #

    My how those months have flown by … just seeing those little seedlings is very heartening Leanne .. we have to trust that nature can sometimes to get on a re group without our help in the beginnings there isn’t much else to do at first .There’s a beauty though in those old burnt out old misshapen trees and trunks .
    Sad to see the auction sign :-/
    Hope you take some time to relax a bit Leanne … it’s not really you for too long though is it 😉

    June 29, 2014
    • It is one thing that is always certain, it will regenerate, it has always happened and it will continue to happen. There is beauty in it, I agree, I love seeing them, the shapes are wonderful.
      The auction sign is a bit of joke, the guy whose property was lost there, has put it up, he has a great sense of humour.
      It has been very busy, and I am looking forward to getting home, though so much to do there too, though end of the week I should get a chance to sit still for a while.
      Thanks Poppytump.

      June 29, 2014
  18. Beautiful photos, deep dark colors accentuated those little green islands of life. I am certain that life will go on, long after the last human walked the earth.

    June 29, 2014
    • What a great description, thank you so much. Life will go on, we can nearly always be certain of it.

      June 29, 2014
  19. We watched a program on BBC TV recently about wild fires in Australia….it was fascinating and very scary. But one of the things that struck me was the speed and variety of plant growth following a fire…..in fact some plants have evolved to thrive in those conditions.

    June 29, 2014
    • That is true, the Eucalyptus, especially, thrive after fires, I have heard, don’t know if it is true, that their seeds need to be burned to regenerate. It could be a myth, but the bushland used to be burned a regular basis before white invasion. The Aborigines would burn areas so they could hunt the animals better. Some things don’t come back, like pine trees, once they are burned that is that. In a couple of years the area will be covered in new growth, can’t wait to see. Thanks Mark.

      June 30, 2014
  20. Yeah, well… rest never sleeps. Neither does nature. Mostly that’s a good thing.

    June 30, 2014
    • That’s for sure Ray, and I think in the bush, it is definitely a good thing.

      June 30, 2014
  21. Such a heartwarming story, Leanne. I enjoyed your photos. 🙂

    June 30, 2014
    • That’s wonderful, thank you. 🙂

      June 30, 2014
  22. Great shots, Leanne – the weather looks so threatening. Is that a koala up a tree? Glad to see new growth coming.

    June 30, 2014
    • Thank you Richard, the weather was very icy and cold, we did get a spot of rain, but not a lot. No Koala, well not that I am aware of, but there is a Kangaroo jumping away in about the middle of the image.

      June 30, 2014
      • How did I miss that?!

        June 30, 2014
      • Haha, did you go back and see it?

        June 30, 2014
      • Been back – still can’t see it. I feel foolish.

        June 30, 2014
      • It is very small, if you go down the middle of the image, about a 1/3 of the way up in the background, almost behind the trees it is jumping away, sort of above the black stump.

        June 30, 2014
      • Oh, yes, now I can see it!

        June 30, 2014
      • Oh, I am so glad. We saw so many while we were there, jumping around everywhere, so different to the last time I was there.

        June 30, 2014
  23. Beautiful series

    June 30, 2014
  24. LB #

    I see an animal of some sort, heading away from you, long tail? (I didn’t let myself look through the comments to get a clue).
    The starkness of the burned out trees against that cold sky are sadly beautiful. But then … Mother Nature begins to bounce back.
    Fire is so destructive but often times necessary (fire suppression in the west of the US has led to far greater damage when the fire finally starts).

    July 1, 2014
    • You are right LB, it is a kangaroo, it was jumping away from us. I agree, I love those. She really does bounce back and she does it so well. The same has happened here, fires end up so worse before the fuel is just left there for years to come.

      July 1, 2014
  25. Awesome photos! Isn’t the world a wonderful place 🙂 (my travel fever keeps getting worse and worse…. :D)

    July 1, 2014
    • It certainly is, and I know what you mean about travel fever, thank you.

      July 1, 2014
  26. Wonderful images. I love how some areas are highlighted and others desaturated.

    July 1, 2014
  27. Beautiful pictures! Love the campfire. You’ve captured it wonderfully!

    July 2, 2014
    • Thank you, I actually got some photos of the fire, will have to show them one day.

      July 2, 2014

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