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Up for Discussion – Street Photography

Street photography is a very popular style of photography and there are people all over the world taking to the streets to see what they can capture.  I don’t do it a lot of it, but I do follow some people that do, so I asked Shane Francescut from The Weekly Minute if he would write a post for you on Street Photography.

If you can smell the street by looking at the photo, it’s a street photograph.  Bruce Gilden

Street photography is a photographic style that many people enjoy viewing, but tend to shy away from attempting it themselves. And, from my experience the number one reason for not trying it is a concern for the privacy of others. I see street photography as a way of documenting a moment in time or telling a story about life in a certain place, at a specific point in history. There are many subsets to street photography – candid shots, street portraits, and architectural images, so I think the genre can appeal to a wide range of people.

In this article, I’ll attempt to ease your discomforts and relax your hesitations about street photography with a few tips and examples that I’ve picked up along the way. Photography is about experimentation and pushing your creative limits, and if you choose to ignore any one style of photography simply because of discomfort, then you may not discover your true potential.

Street photography has helped me learn a lot about myself as a photographer, and it has greatly helped me improve every facet of photography. Through street photography, I have become much more comfortable and confident when shooting studio portraits, I have learned to identify the key elements and angles that produce strong imagery, and I have learned to pay attention to smaller details that would have escaped me in the past. And with that, here are my seven tips to help you make stronger images on the street.

1 - stop moving

1. Stop moving

Our first instinct when street shooting is to wander the streets at a torrid pace, frantically searching for that decisive moment to capture and share. It is always helpful to casually walk about the streets, but pause at busy intersections during rush hour or let a few trains or busses pass while waiting on the platform, taking a few minutes to see what might unfold. Alternatively, find an interesting background and let the scene find you. I find that this is difficult to do because the urge to keep your feet moving is strong, however this technique can produce an excellent image, if not a whole series that you’d be proud to share.

2 - plan a route

2. Plan a route

Many people think that street photographers have a knack for capturing moments anywhere they venture. The truth is prolific street photographers take time before a photo session to plan the routes that they know will give them the best chances at capturing quality images. Plan a photo walk through a market, or an area with several outdoor patios, or shoot from an overpass such as a bridge or balcony above a busy plaza. I learned the hard way that aimlessly walking and shooting is a waste of time and most often results in nothing to show for it.

3 - ditch the zoom

3. Ditch the zoom and use a wide-angle prime

I don’t necessarily agree that you should only use prime lenses while doing street photography, but I do agree that wide angle lenses help to tell better stories. Many of the images on my blog are captured with a focal length of 24mm-30mm, and I find that by getting more of the scene in a frame, the viewer gains a better sense and feeling of the moment. The other advantage to using a single prime lens is that you develop a consistent point of view, thus making it easier to visualize what an image will look like before you raise the camera to your eye. Many people struggle with photography because they use too many different lenses and focal lengths, and they never gain the opportunity to really learn how to use what they have.

4 - always carry camera

4. Always carry your camera with you

Always, always, always take your camera with you when you leave the house. There will be times when you don’t pull it out of your bag, but if you have your camera handy you are far more likely to return home with some great images. I found that once I took this advice, I captured far more images, and the quality of my images greatly improved. This also speaks to owning a camera that is compact and light weight, but I’ll speak to that later in this post.

5 - smile and be courteous

5. Smile often, be respectful, ask for permission

Friendliness, respectfulness, and permission have made it possible for me to branch into street portraiture. Granted, street portraits might not be the ultimate goal of everyone who tries street photography, but by being friendly with strangers it can help to calm your nerves and make the whole shooting experience a pleasant one. If your aim is to capture candid images and someone notices that you’ve taken their picture, feel free to complement an article of clothing or some other feature about them, and be on your way. People tend to respond very well when randomly complemented.

6 - capture movement

6. Capture movement

We see movement everywhere we look, but when captured in a photograph, movement adds excitement and wonder to a scene that might otherwise have gone unnoticed. Movement can be captured through techniques such as panning, adding blur, or freezing action. Leanne has written on the topic of panning before, but that is difficult to do and takes practice. I tend to capture movement by combining a blurred object with a still object, but you can also freeze movement, such as in sports photography which lets our eyes take in a scene that may have otherwise happened too quickly to see in real life.

7 - shoot from the hip

7. Shoot from the hip

When starting out with street photography, nerves and fear can easily get the better of us. To combat this, spend your first few sessions shooting with your camera dangling around your waste. You’ll be surprised with the results. Shooting from the hip achieves two things; first, it helps you train your eye to look for those decisive moments that make for great street photographs while disguising the fact that you’re taking someone’s picture. Second, it allows you to capture images from a different vantage point that is different from what we’re used to seeing which instantly provides a different point of interest.

Gear

I’m not a big fan of gear talk, but I’ll touch on it briefly here. You can read hundreds of articles about what people say is the right gear for street photography, however my simple take on the subject is this, use what you have, and if you’re in the market for something new then look for a compact and light weight camera such as one of the many new mirrorless offerings on the market. Fuji and Sony make several mirrorless models that are inexpensive and produce tremendous image quality, and there is a growing list of lenses available for all brands. As mentioned earlier, a wide angle lens allows you to capture more of a scene; however you have to use what you’re comfortable with. If you’d prefer to stand two hundred yards away from someone when you’re taking their picture, then by all means, use a long zoom. It ultimately depends on your style and taste.

Dangers

As with anything in life, I suspect there might be dangers, however, Toronto is a very safe city and I have only been confronted on one occasion. The funny thing is that I wasn’t taking his picture, I was taking a picture of a colourful flower that happened to be lying next to his car and he was briefly concerned until he found out what I was doing.

While taking photos on the street I always recommend that you think smart, don’t put yourself in vulnerable positions, and don’t walk around dodgy neighbourhoods alone late at night. With that in mind, as long as your convey confidence and courteousness, you should be fine.

I am honoured, and thankful to Leanne for inviting me to share my knowledge of street photography with her blogging community. Leanne is one of the finest photographers I know, and she has done so much to help me and the rest of her readership become better photographers through her blog.

Thank you Shane for that great post, I certainly picked up some ideas and I might even have a go at this one day.  Don’t forget you can go and see more of Shane’s images on his blog, The Weekly Minute, but for now, enjoy the above images in a gallery, and some more that Shane sent for the post.  Shane will answer any questions you have, but remember we are all in different time zones, so it might take a while to get an answer.  

118 Comments
  1. Great photographs of Toronto and its people!

    July 22, 2014
    • Thank you so much Victor 🙂 There are a lot of terrific subjects.

      July 22, 2014
  2. Great article and photographs.

    July 22, 2014
    • Thank you Luis. I’m glad you enjoyed the post, it means a lot to me because I follow you and am a big fan of your work as well.

      July 22, 2014
      • Thanks Shane. The work is pretty cool. Did you say you live in austin. I need your email

        July 22, 2014
      • I will be in Toronto later this year. I hear it’s a great city to visit

        July 22, 2014
      • Oh man, that’s great. Too bad I’m not there it I would be happy to tour you around. Let me know when you’re leaving, I’d be happy to recommend some spots.

        July 23, 2014
      • I will do. Thanks.

        July 24, 2014
      • 🙂

        July 25, 2014
  3. These are fantastic images of street photography. Some brilliant tips from Shane. I have wanted to have a go at street photography for a while but it is definately something that makes me feel nervous about doing. I just need to build some confidence to give it a go. I think I’m just too conscious about people around me and what they think.

    July 22, 2014
    • Hi Sabrina, thank you for the comment… I’m glad you enjoyed the post and images. One of the secrets to success in any type of photography is gaining confidence, and without practice, you’ll never find the confidence you need. I suggest just getting out there and starting with shooting from the hip, you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

      July 22, 2014
  4. I’ve found that the street photos that are most interesting are in the places most difficult to take photos!

    July 22, 2014
    • I think you’re on to something with your comment. Combine that element with great lighting and you’ve probably got yourself a pretty stellar image.

      July 22, 2014
  5. Jackie Saulmon Ramirez #

    I love the burgundy hat against the yellow wall! Street are is time consuming for me to look at because of the layers of detail. But that’s a good thing.

    Love this quote: “If you can smell the street by looking at the photo, it’s a street photograph.” – Bruce Gilden

    July 22, 2014
    • Hi Jackie, that portrait was one of my favorite shoots to date. The two girls who let me take their portraits that day were so fun and easy to work with. I’m really glad I stopped them. If you’re interested, here is the rest of the shoot – http://wp.me/p2fKaT-uX

      July 22, 2014
      • Jackie Saulmon Ramirez #

        Wow, they are beautiful! There’s something about the hat and the yellow; maybe it’s the contrast of bold colors. The lovely girls don’t hurt either. 🙂

        July 22, 2014
  6. Great article and photos, I know someone who does street photography as a hobby and in my opinion he gets it wrong (although I couldn’t bring myself to tell him) as a lot of his seem too obtrusive, and too up close and personal. I have tried it myself, but mostly of street performers or taken from a reasonable distance that shows a scene rather than focusing on one person

    July 22, 2014
    • I’m so glad you stopped by to read and comment. Photography is an art, so I suppose we all interpret it differently and we’re all drawn to different elements. As long as your friend enjoys what he’s shooting, I think that’s all that really matters 🙂

      July 22, 2014
  7. Terrific article Leanne. Being new at this genre of photography, Shane’s tips are encouraging and prudent. Thanks for posting this…Cheers!

    July 22, 2014
    • Dan, I love what you do over at your blog so I’m sure you don’t need any advice from me on how to make images 🙂 However, thanks so much for stopping by and reading.

      July 22, 2014
      • OMG…are YOU the “Shane”. I had no idea, lol. Well, your article was excellent and I DID learn quite a bit. So, thanks Shane, and Bravo on your talent. Cheers!

        July 22, 2014
  8. Sudarshan Mondal #

    You have correctly pointed out what is primarily needed for street photography, I do a lot street shots I n New York City. I guess people are too comfortable with camera here and I have not faced much difficulty in street. But yes, with street photography I have learned a lot about photography… this is only my primary interest currently. Thank you for sharing wonderful article… appreciate a lot.

    July 22, 2014
    • Thank you so much for the terrific comment. I am jealous that you live in NYC and would love to shoot there someday.

      July 22, 2014
  9. Some really good tips, I haven’t really tried street photography, I have a friend who does a bit of it and it’s always been a goal of mine to at least attempt it, but I may be going out of my comfort zone, but with the tips from Shane I maybe able to achieve something

    July 22, 2014
    • It’s all about composition, and 99% of the time people don’t even notice you’re there.

      July 22, 2014
  10. Embracing a Wounded Soul #

    Great article. I’m a total newbie to the photography world. I love street photography. So many good pointers here. Thank you.

    July 22, 2014
    • Thank you! I’m so glad you enjoyed the article.

      July 22, 2014
      • Embracing a Wounded Soul #

        Your welcome 🙂

        July 22, 2014
  11. Great post! I’m off to Shane’s blog…

    July 22, 2014
  12. Love your work Shane!

    July 22, 2014
    • And I love your garden Julie… I’m so envious 🙂

      July 22, 2014
  13. Nelson #

    I find with street photography the more you do it, the more you become confortable at it and the more confortable you are the better the photos will be. My first experiences at street photography were non conclusive, I did improve although I am far from where I want to be

    July 22, 2014
    • I have exactly the same sentiments Nelson… well said 🙂

      July 22, 2014
  14. Reblogged this on Rock Thiz Magazine.

    July 22, 2014
  15. Great post and loads of information on street, thanks. In the first part “Stop moving” is good advice, this gives you time to settle down and be ready for what may happen. However, you mention Bruce Giiden. If watch films on his street photography he doesn’t keep still, always moving looking for the next subject. Joel Meyerowitz also talks about Robert Frank being balletic in his movements on the streets. Maybe, different styles for different people. I am still learning street photography, so I try both methods to find out my style.
    Check out the video on Street Photography “Everybody Street” on Vimeo. I have learned a lot from this vid.
    Once again for the post.

    July 22, 2014
    • You’re right, Bruce Gilden and Joel Meyerowitz do tend to move around quite a bit, and the street photography doc you noted is a good one… I’ve seen it 🙂 Quite often I find myself walking more than not, but I think it’s a good practice to do both. You never know what you’ll find.

      July 22, 2014
  16. Toronto is a great subject for street photography and I have done a bit of it there myself. Wonderful place, wonderful streets, and a talented view of it all. Thanks for sharing.

    July 22, 2014
  17. A brilliant post, fascinating read.

    July 22, 2014
  18. Very good guide, thank you.

    July 22, 2014
  19. terrific article with some great pointers in it

    July 22, 2014
    • Glad you enjoyed it. I hope you were able to take something away from it.

      July 22, 2014
  20. Awesome. I love street photography. I think it tells more of a story about a place than planned and posed photographs. I really enjoyed these tips. 🙂

    July 22, 2014
    • I’m glad you enjoyed the post. Aren’t these guest posts wonderful? I’m so glad Leanne is doing them. I just love learning from others.

      July 22, 2014
  21. The only time I felt physically threatened, was here in my home town. Also, I was not even facing the direction of the person who was upset at me. But it did highlight the potential danger. The fellow was mentally unbalanced, based on his odd and extreme reaction, but how does one know this when just walking down the street? When I’m in a foreign country I ask permission to take a person’s photo. Recently I found it was not welcome a lot of the time and I respected the people’s wishes. So this is a very tricky genre. I admire Shane’s photos but I think for the most part, I will leave the street photography to him!! Good article!

    July 22, 2014
    • I’m glad you weren’t hurt thought…

      I haven’t had the pleasure of taking photos in different countries, but I am aware that it may not be accepted in certain places, whether it be related to cultural, religious, or other reasons. It’s always a good idea to do a little research before embarking on your journey.

      July 22, 2014
  22. Great guest post. Lots of interesting images and great tips/advice!

    July 22, 2014
  23. lelahb39 #

    love, as always

    July 22, 2014
  24. I’m glad Shane is being featured! I love his work and follow what he does. This article is really great! It gives some valuable tips for people like me who would most likely be frantically running around instead of staying in one place. Thanks for sharing what he has to say about street photography.

    July 22, 2014
    • Thanks Laura, but the next time I’m in SF I’m coming straight to you for a city tour.

      July 23, 2014
      • there ya go! Just let me know. 🙂

        July 23, 2014
  25. Fantastic photographs! Real life is SO much more interesting, love it! http://www.tresorsdeluxe.wordpress.com

    July 22, 2014
    • Yes, real life, when uninterrupted, can be fascinating.

      July 23, 2014
  26. I am grateful for this awesome post. I love when others share their knowledge to others. I love the pics and the hints. Thank you.

    July 22, 2014
    • Thank you so much Kim! I’m glad you enjoyed the post. I also love all the other guest posts that come out each week.

      July 23, 2014
  27. nice article + great pictures = awesome blog
    🙂

    July 22, 2014
  28. Shane’s 7 suggestions + are excellent and very useful. I particularly agree with the idea of selecting a place and waiting for the action to happen. It does work and it saves on wear and tear.
    Thank you Leanne for including Shane, his comments and photographs.

    July 22, 2014
    • Tim, thanks for the kinds words, and yes, staying in one place can definitely save the tread on your shoes.

      July 23, 2014
  29. great gallery!

    July 22, 2014
  30. Great post and great set of images 😊

    July 22, 2014
  31. I absolutely love the idea of street photography, but as yet don’t quite have the confidence to do it well – so thank you so much Shane for giving us such good, clear advice on the best way to approach it…: and thank you Leanne too! 🙂

    July 22, 2014
    • Thank YOU Ruth, and you’re welcome. The only way to gain confidence is to get out there and start shooting.

      July 23, 2014
  32. Beautiful photos! Thanks for the tips

    July 22, 2014
    • You’re welcome, and thanks for stopping by Leanne’s blog to read.

      July 23, 2014
  33. Unfortunately, the trend in Europe is to ban street photography. In France, Denmark, Norway, Germany and most recently Hungary, one may mot publish one’s likeness without permission. Where I live, Texas, there is a strange statute which makes any photo taken for “sexual gratification” a felony. People have been convicted under this statute when the subject was fully clothed and in public. Kind of scary.

    July 22, 2014
    • Yes, I wouldn’t doubt if that trend continues to grow, but with so many European countries relying so heavily on tourism, I have a hard time believing that cops will be running after every person holding a camera in their hands. I’m not up for sexually explicit photos, and I agree with Eric Kim in that I feel it isn’t right to photograph homeless people. It all falls under the topic of exploitation, and if someone’s being stupid with their camera then they may deserve the consequences that befall them.

      Thanks for commenting Ron, I always love finding your posts in my Reader.

      July 23, 2014
      • Attitudes are so extreme in France that street photography is impossible as a practical matter.

        July 23, 2014
      • That’s crazy, but to each his own.

        July 23, 2014
  34. Reblogged this on and commented:
    I am honoured to have been able to write a guest post on Leanne Cole’s blog about strert photography tips and tricks. Here is the article, and please check out her other work… it is fantastic.

    July 22, 2014
  35. A fantastic post about street photography, from one of the best! Nice work, Shane! 😀

    July 22, 2014
    • Far too kind, but always nice chatting with you through the comments 🙂

      July 23, 2014
  36. great advice for a change. I read so much that is about the hunt, the gear, the ego. This is about love of the people and respect for them, it’s about enjoying the process of street photography and I hope it encouranges a lot of people to develop their own vision and make their own rules! thank you…and by the way, the images are pretty fantastic too

    July 22, 2014
    • Paul, thank you so much for the wonderful comment. Yes, photography should primarily be about having fun… unless you are making money at it, in which case I hope that it’s still fun 🙂

      I’m glad you enjoyed the post, and I’m glad that my theme and tone of the piece came across perfectly for you.

      July 23, 2014
  37. I ever experiment (out of curiosity) to do street photography by non-stop walking. The result is interesting and produces giddy feeling 😀

    July 22, 2014
  38. Wonderful article and I would like to use it with my high school students in the fall with your permission. I find it easier when I am visiting my sister in New York City to shoot street photography.. In my own city, I feel I am more vulnerable, less anonymous, I don’t photograph homeless people but have to examine my thinking? Your article is excellent and I like your suggestion of standing still. And I do ask permission to photograph people and people are mostly cooperative.

    July 22, 2014
    • Ruth, thanks for stopping by and I’m really happy that you enjoyed the article so much. If Leanne doesn’t mind you using the article with your class, then neither do I. If you need anything else, please don’t hesitate to contact me at sfrancescut@gmail.com

      July 23, 2014
  39. Thanks for the great article Shane! I’m not too much into some street photography, not so much for some of the reasons you mentioned, but more so because the lack of interest. I have been becoming more interested in architectural photography however. I do like how you include a lot of the scenery in your photos around the people which is why I like viewing your photos. I am more drawn to the scenery than the people and like the way that you process your photos. I also find a lot of similarities between your tips for street photography and landscape photography, excluding shooting from the hip of course.

    I know that when I first started shooting landscape, especially around more visited areas, I would wait until no one was around to set up and start shooting as I felt nervous about people watching what I was doing. After a awhile I just learned how to ignore them and found some people become interested in what you are doing and it can start up a nice conversation. There are some buildings I’d like to photograph if I could find the time, but I always tend to put my landscape shots ahead of other things I’d like to do.

    Keep up the good work Shane! I always look forward to your blog posts.

    July 22, 2014
    • Justin, it’s always fantastic to get your insights as I am a huge fan of your work 🙂 It would actually be pretty cool to do a post on the similarities between street and landscape photography. Perhaps the planning, preparation, and processes are the same, but the results are so wildly different… and that’s cool.

      July 23, 2014
      • That’s a good idea for a post Shane. I’ll have to remember that. I think I can try to get a post together to go into detail with those points what I do for my shots. I’ll explain the planning, preparation, processes, and anything else I can think of to how I get my shots. That will be my goal for my next learning/tips post. Thanks Shane! 🙂

        July 23, 2014
      • Fantastic! I’ll keep an eye out for that since I have a lot of great landscape opportunities here.

        July 23, 2014
      • From some of your recent photos I see you have plenty of great views to photograph as landscape photography. I’ll try to get a post together within the next week or two.

        July 24, 2014
      • That would be amazing Justin. The real beauty hits in the fall when all the leaves change colour.

        July 25, 2014
  40. An interesting read. Enjoyed your shots of Toronto.

    July 22, 2014
  41. A very interesting article with lots of good tips and insights.

    It is also interesting timing for me as I just saw the Garry Winogrand retrospective at the Met here in NYC. Winogrand, of course, refused to call himself a street photographer. “I am a photographer, a still photographer. That’s it.”

    In the end, we don’t get to define our work. That is always up to others.

    Winogrand was an advocate of standing still but a bigger advocate of keeping on the move. One student describes watching him cruise down a short crowded block and finishing a roll of film in the time it took to walk the block,

    “Photography is about finding out what can happen in the frame. When you put four edges around some facts, you change those facts.”

    “[If I saw something in my viewfinder that looked familiar to me, I would] do something to shake it up.”

    And (to me) perhaps the most important quote from a photographer that I have ever read…

    “No one moment is most important. Any moment can be something.”

    Garry Winogrand

    Leanne thank you for an informative guest post.

    Shane, I am off to visit your blog!

    July 22, 2014
  42. Great article Shane. Well written and of course amazing images.

    July 22, 2014
  43. Reblogged this on Ryan Photography and commented:
    Thank you Leanne and Shane Francescut for this informative post… I have always fancied doing street photography but don’t have the courage. Maybe I might find that courage after reading this post.

    July 23, 2014
    • Good luck Bren, and thanks for the reblog 🙂

      July 24, 2014
      • You are welcome

        July 24, 2014
  44. Thanks Leanne for again highlighting someone wonderful to follow. Shane I really like your style and I love the photos of Toronto. I live very close but have been unable to get in to the city this summer. I now feel even more motivated to do so. My favourite place to shoot is in Kensington market. Thanks, great shots one and all!

    July 23, 2014
    • Thanks Paula! I’m really honoured to have motivated you. Even just spending one afternoon in Kensington would provide you with enough images for the year. It’s such a magical place.

      July 24, 2014
  45. Great tips, great photos Leanne. I love that thought “smell the street.”

    July 23, 2014
  46. Thanks Shane!!

    July 23, 2014
  47. I adore Street and try to do as much as I can. Although Im new to photography this is the genre that most appeals due to the randomness coupled with the narrative. There’s often great humour in street shots too. Nice to read these tips. Thanks

    July 23, 2014
  48. I like your article and most of your descriptions are fit as my experiences. Except, I am beginning to switch from DSLR to smartphone camera in recent years due flexibility and less intrusion from passerby.
    My old trick is uses wireless camera remote control when doing street photography and hiding it inside my pocket jacket so I will look much like a tourist who looking for direction with camera hanging in my chest. Works for me.
    The drawback is it often failed in thick jacket due weak signal.
    Great pictures presentation too.

    July 24, 2014
  49. I thought this article from Resource might be of interest to this discussion…
    http://resourcemagonline.com/2014/07/everybody-street-profiles-nyc-s-greatest-street-photographers/#_amtubti6

    July 25, 2014
  50. Thank you, Leanne, for having Shane over to talk about street photography. Shane – you put some of my fave shots up here today. I always look forward to your posts at The Weekly Minute. Toronto’s loss is Ottawa’s gain. Love the Bruce Gilden quote. Oh, and I’ve bookmarked this post for future reference. Cheers!

    July 25, 2014
    • My pleasure Elen, glad you enjoyed it.

      July 25, 2014
  51. Great post Shane, really useful pointers to capturing great images on the streets. For me it is about having the confidence and waiting for things to happen around you. I wait for up to 3 or 4 hours in one place just to capture the right mood or lighting! No different to landscape photography really.
    Just get out there and enjoy the moment. If you respect people they will usually respect what you are trying to create.
    I find it helps to have my smartphone ready to show people my websites and blogs so that I can explain what I am doing. Most people love me to take a street portrait of them or like to stop to have a chat.
    I personally have no problem with photographing anyone on the street. I suppose part of my reasoning is that here in the UK we are filmed continuously by hundreds of CCTV cameras without our permission by the State and have no way of stopping that happening.
    The police have attempted to stop me by threatening to arrest me in the past but I find that they are not always aware of the law on taking photos themselves!
    Just be respectful and don’t cause offence or an obstruction and as Shane says, enjoy creating your Art.
    Think of all the incredible photographs taken over the years by documentary photographers and how much we would have lost if they had not bothered to carry their cameras with them.

    July 25, 2014
  52. Reblogged this on threelensesphotography and commented:
    Thought this was really useful as Leia and I have been talking abot doing some street photography! So here’s a taste of what might appear on our blog later in the year! – Amelia.

    August 1, 2014
  53. Great advice. I have tried a few times to attempt some Street Photography in Prague, to get out of my comfort zone. Not a bad experience, although I still have much to learn and improve upon 🙂

    August 1, 2014

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