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Weekend Wanderings: Quarantine Station

point-nepean-quarantine-station

A friend and I have decided to start hiking.  Of course, for me, this means going to places and taking photos. We decided that the first place we would go for a hike would be Point Nepean. We went down past Portsea to see what we could find.

We found ourselves at the Quarantine Station, which stopped being one a long time ago, but all the buildings are still there.  With all the talk of Ebola and the possibility of it spreading, many people are talking about quarantining people again, it was interesting to visit a place that was used for that sort of thing over 150 years ago.  There are many sites about the history of the station, but the best one I found was Nepean Historical Society, and their page on the Quarantine Station 1854.

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There’s no doubting that where the quarantine station, and the area around, is beautiful.  It is an amazing place and we are so lucky that it is now parklands and will be protected, well we hope.  The Victorian Government is going to allow private developers to build a resort in this area, which means land that is available to everyone will become basically private land unless you have a lot of money to pay to stay at the resort.  Not good in my books.

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The Disinfecting Building

Many of the buildings are open and you can just wander around them and inside them.  Best to start by going to information and getting a map to see what is there and what is open.  The above image is from the disinfecting building, where they disinfected the luggage.  Massive boilers and, I don’t even know what the thing in the photo is called.  Quite amazing.

I photographed some of the signs that might give you more information about some of the places here.

point-nepean-quarantine-station

Hospital

One of the hospitals.  Quite amazing and imposing buildings really.  This one was open and we were able to go inside, there will be photos from inside in the gallery.  Must have been an incredible place, scary, people arriving here and having survived the trip, to be put away with the fear of disease hanging over them.  I’m so glad travelling overseas is much different these days.

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There are places that look lovely, like this avenue of trees and you can see the ocean here, just over on the right.

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Cook House

People were responsible for cooking their own meals, from what we could tell, in the beginning anyway. This little building is right behind the hospital and it was called the Cook House.

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Echidna

This was one of the best things we saw all day.  We first saw the Echidna when we got there, but some other people were watching it and it basically ran away from us. As we were leaving to head out on our hike, we saw it again, and this time it didn’t run away, it was too busy looking for ants, sticking its nose into the ground.

We really didn’t get enough time to explore the Quarantine Station as we needed to move on and do our hike, but we both realised that we had got their too late in the morning so next time the plan is to get there much earlier.  I love places like this so would really like to do that. I have a map for you as well.

I am going to put some more images into a gallery for you now, just click on one to see them individually.  I hope you are having a great weekend, Christmas is finally starting to make an impact on our house, present are being brought and a small tree has made an appearance.

 

98 Comments
  1. Those are impressive vault doors. Great series. The echidna is really cute.

    December 20, 2014
    • They are, they look so heavy, I don’t think I would like to be trapped in them. They are such funny things, echidnas very cute, I don’t think I would like to pick one up though.

      December 20, 2014
  2. Leanne, This is really fascinating, and just the kind of photo essay I enjoy, and try to produce from time to time. If I ever get to Australia, this is one place that is on my bucket list. Thank you.

    December 20, 2014
    • Thank you, that is great to hear, oh yes, this place should be on your bucket list, it is really interesting.

      December 20, 2014
  3. Great photos of the buildings. The trolley tracks are well constructed. I hope we never need this stuff again.

    December 20, 2014
    • Thank you John, I hope so too.

      December 20, 2014
  4. Not the cheeriest place I’ve ever seen, but it’s not the worst either. Actually, I’ve paid for vacations at worse places. It looks relatively civilized.

    December 20, 2014
    • No not a cheery place, but it is interesting, when you think about all the people that travelled for months to get here, and then had the fear of the voyage, diseases, and having to go and stay there for a time, not a great place. I don’t think you can stay there anymore, but I have to say I thought it would be a good place to stay, especially if you like the ocean, it is quite amazing around there.

      December 20, 2014
  5. Hi Leanne,

    That device you mentioned could be a type of autoclave. I will have to add this to the must visit list.

    December 20, 2014
    • I don’t know what it is, they must’ve used steam to disinfect, maybe, but you could be right. Yes, a great place to go and check out.

      December 20, 2014
  6. Great photos and what an interesting place. There are a lot of stories from there that are lost to us now. 😀

    December 20, 2014
    • So true Raewyn, though they have words that were said by some people, maybe there are stories, I might have to investigate. Thanks 😀

      December 20, 2014
  7. Reblogged this on Benji Martin Photography.

    December 20, 2014
  8. For being so old, the buildings are in great shape! They must be well maintained even after all these years.

    Tamara

    December 20, 2014
    • What’s that saying, “they don’t build ’em like they used to”. For buildings that were probably put up quickly they have last well, I don’t know they do a lot to them to maintain them.
      Thanks Tamara.

      December 20, 2014
  9. An interesting piece of history

    December 20, 2014
    • It is, I’ve only recently become aware that it was there, I want to go back. Thanks Ken.

      December 20, 2014
  10. Lots of cool lines and angles in the old buildings.

    December 20, 2014
    • You can imagine what they would build these days, boxes.

      December 20, 2014
  11. Interesting! Looks de-humanizing, huh? Sorry about the privatization. 😦 Great series, Leanne.

    December 20, 2014
    • Yes, I don’t know that it was a comforting place. Yes the privatization is a massive problem, I hope it doesn’t go ahead. Thanks Nia. 😀

      December 20, 2014
  12. Great Essay and fascinating images giving us a glimpse to a completely different time. The signs were particularly helpful. Thanks for putting this together.

    December 20, 2014
    • Thank you Robin, yes, the glimpses are so fascinating. I should have done more signs, sorry, will do better the next time I go. You’re welcome, hopefully I can do a better one the next time.

      December 20, 2014
  13. Pat #

    What a fascinating historic site! The buildings look to be in great shape.
    Love that echidna,

    December 20, 2014
    • It is Pat, I think because it is too far away for kids, it doesn’t get graffitied, or they are onto it straight away.
      The echidna was a great find there, loved watching it going about its business.

      December 20, 2014
  14. Jackie Saulmon Ramirez #

    Echidna is new for me; I don’t think I ever saw one. It looks like a cross between an aardvark, a porcupine and a hedgehog.

    The buildings have a primitive beauty about them. It would be a shame to turn it over to developers. 😦 Those trees…. they are gorgeous.

    December 20, 2014
    • They are also known as spiny anteaters Jackie, there is a very famous ad from here of a woman lying on a bed with ants crawling all over her and she says “sic em Rex”
      I don’t know if they are going to turn this bit over to the developers, I think they have plans for undeveloped areas, you know how it is, how dare we have land that is just sitting there. It drives me crazy.

      December 20, 2014
  15. An amazing place! Thanks for showing the pics.

    December 20, 2014
    • You’re welcome Dean, it is an amazing bit of our history.

      December 20, 2014
  16. Love, love, love this post and what an amazing eye you have!
    Best in 2015.
    Celia

    December 20, 2014
    • Thank you and all the best to you for the year ahead Celia. Merry Christmas

      December 20, 2014
  17. I love the photos inside the Disinfecting Building, eery and beautiful.

    December 20, 2014
    • It is a pretty amazing building, I have to admit I just kept saying wow.

      December 20, 2014
  18. What an amazing place! Such an interesting series of photos and the place itself.
    Those big doors are fantastic and very useful in their day, Im sure.
    Glad your tree made its appearance 😃
    Enjoy your hiking.. what a wonderful idea.

    December 20, 2014
    • I wish I had done more there, but it isn’t that far away, so I am sure I can go back and do it again.
      It certainly did make an appearance, it is bare, but that is okay.
      Thanks Robyn, we think it is, great opportunity to photograph some things we would otherwise do.

      December 20, 2014
  19. Great post Leanne. Wonderful photos .. Not good news bout the resort though!

    December 20, 2014
    • It sucks about the resort, I hope it doesn’t happen, but since our government seems to care more about their mates than the rest of us, it will go ahead. Thank you Julie, it was a great place to explore.

      December 20, 2014
  20. Fascinating and frightening. Wonderful images. Can you imagine the state of mind of the residents? Yikes. Far from home and “quarantined.” I also think the disinfectant chamber is an autoclave. In high school I had a job in a hospital supplies lab. We sanitized our instruments in a similar but much smaller chamber. Thanks for sharing this slice of history, Leanne.

    December 20, 2014
    • I know what you mean Mary, it must have been terrifying, I’ve heard that the voyage here was really scary, and many never made it, the shoreline of the southern coast is also very scary. They called them disinfecting chambers, there is no other name given, I checked, one used gas for the luggage, and the other used formaldehyde for bedding and such. So strange, I wouldn’t have thought of that. You’re welcome Mary, it was nice to do a post like this, might see about doing more next year. You have a Merry Christmas Mary and Happy New Year Mary.

      December 20, 2014
      • Merry Christmas to you too, Leanne,
        and all good wishes through the New Year ~
        Mary

        December 21, 2014
      • thank you Mary.

        December 21, 2014
  21. A nice variety of images from your meanderings…

    December 21, 2014
  22. This place looks awesome! Thank you for sharing 🙂

    December 21, 2014
    • It is pretty amazing, I wasn’t expecting it to look so good. YOu’re welcome and thank you Sabina. 😀

      December 21, 2014
  23. Interesting building and history! I love the avenue of trees and the hedgehog!!!!

    December 21, 2014
    • I love going to places like this that are part of our history. Oh the hedgehog, is that a chocolate slice you eat, LOL it is here. We don’t get to see echidnas very often. Thanks Cybele.

      December 21, 2014
      • yes to chocolate echidnas!! 😀

        December 21, 2014
      • Do you have that slice there Cybele, it is very yummy. 😀

        December 21, 2014
  24. What an interesting place. Hopefully ebola won’t make places like this commonplace in the near future.

    December 21, 2014
    • I hope so too John, it would be terrible, I’m sure it won’t though. It was interesting wandering around it though.

      December 21, 2014
  25. Hi LCP,
    Great photos and wonderfully informative article. And the echidna is so cute we want to cuddle and squeeze him, spines and all.
    Though scary to have been at such a hospital for the patients, as a viewer of the pics, I am comforted by seeing the huge disinfectant ovens. Odie and I are germophobes after living in new York, the city of a millions ills, (and bad smells). Now we love seeing things get cleaned, washed, steamed, spritzed, boiled , etc.
    In today’s world’s of commercial air travel, any person can fly, virtually unchecked, between six continents in six days – no quarantine measures and no health checks. Just big hugs and warm hellos when they arrive at their destination. Thats incredibly terrifying to us. the world blessed that we don’t have a bigger communicable disease problem than we do. Read: Ebola, avian, foot and mouth, and other nasty bugs that we don’t know the names of everywhere.
    We understand that our medicine is better we have antibiotics and vaccines (for some things ). But Still!! Large crowds in long lines gives us Chills chills and no thrills. Maybe it’s time to bring those steamers out and get those luggage germs at airports, and malls, and grocery stores and schools..? Odie suggests a bath like he gets for long distance travelers. Which will never happen because I bathe him by hand in a sink. 🙂
    This essay is why we reluctantly travel, and prefer reading about other people’s brave and wonderful travels!! Thanks for letting us long wind you.
    Hugs, O and om 🐱

    December 21, 2014
    • I can understand how scary it would be, I have a daughter who is a bit like that. Though I don’t know they she is worried that much about travelling.
      I don’t have issues, I rarely get sick, or catch things, I have a good immune system so it doesn’t bother me. Though, I do understand the anxiety of it. I feel safe, at this stage, that those really bad diseases are kept fairly well contained and my chances of getting them are very slim, though foot and mouth, my understanding is that it doesn’t affect people, only animals like cows.
      My fear is the antibiotics, and how we have over used them. Now we are finding that germs have built up tolerances to them and it is hard to get rid of diseases because antibiotics are not as effective as they once were. Superbugs are appearing, and that does scare me. I don’t want to live in a world with no antibiotics.
      Sorry to hear that, but we do what can, and avoid what scares us, so I understand.
      Take care. 😀

      December 21, 2014
      • Yes. Very scary. And I know we have to live brave and get out there and enjoy!!
        You are leading the way in that area. I, for my part, rarely use antibiotics or antibacterial soap. I understand exactly what you’re saying about mrsa and the like. A rising tide of the unseen killer.!! I mean that in a joking way. I think I came across as overly paranoid in my earlier comments. I’m not. I still go out, have fun, and rum, and kiss odie on the mouth when he asks. He’s my little kitty love bear.
        Safe travels. And happy picture taking.
        Hugs,
        We look forward to your nyc pics. When are you traveling to the big city?
        O and om.

        December 21, 2014
      • It is good to get out and I agree, I rarely use antibiotics as well, unfortunately the meat industry use them far too much. The antibacterial soap is so silly, it kills too many good germs as well, and ruins peoples immune system, you have to be exposed to germs to build up your immunity.
        thank you, and NYC, will be there at the beginning of May I believe, That is the plan so far.

        December 21, 2014
      • Excellent.
        Yes. Glad to share a Convo with another well informed blogger!
        Hugs,
        And I look forward to your pics 🙂 in the upcoming year.

        December 21, 2014
      • Yes, important to be informed I think. My husband does a lot of research, and reads a lot, so he keeps me well informed.
        Thank you and you have a Merry Christmas, both of you. 😀

        December 21, 2014
  26. Christine wilson #

    Great to see you finally got down there DDD you get down to the buildings on the beach ??

    December 21, 2014
    • Do you mean the fort Chris, we did get there, but were a bit rushed for time, we realised that we should have gone a lot earlier, but we are hoping to get back.

      December 21, 2014
  27. yes the fort – good reason to go back then I’m hoping to make it there on my hols as well as a million other places

    December 21, 2014
    • The fort is quite amazing as well, I’m saving those photos for the new year. I hope you get there, and I hope I get to go out with you as well, I’m looking forward to that.

      December 21, 2014
  28. Am I interpreting what you wrote correctly in that these might be knocked down for a resort? Because if that’s right, then that’s going to be a giant shame.

    December 21, 2014
    • Oh no, sorry David, I realise now that lots of people must of though this. Where the quarantine station is there is lots of land, parkland, you know for people to explore and such, for the native animals, so they want to use some of that, the parkland for the resort. More public things going to private enterprise, that we end up paying for.

      December 22, 2014
      • Ooh right, thanks for clearing that up. Still sad to hear though… 😦

        December 22, 2014
      • I know what you mean David, it just shouldn’t be allowed, drives me mad. 😦

        December 22, 2014
  29. Impressive building & history,…. pity the vic govt is going to allow private enterprise – but will this still go ahead with the new vic Govt? But if all else fails – cute echidna!

    December 22, 2014
    • I have only just realised that people think the quarantine station is going to be used for private enterprise, but I meant other land down on the point, bushland. I don’t know what will happen Dawn, the Labor govt doesn’t tend to reverse much of what the Libs bring in. I hope it doesn’t though. I loved the echidna. Thanks Dawn.

      December 22, 2014
  30. Great series of pictures.The Door is truly imposing.

    December 23, 2014
    • Thank you, the door was incredible.

      December 23, 2014
  31. Thanks for tasking us on this walk Leanne. Our plastic tree isn’t up yet, but it will be tomorrow! Today we assemble some chairs and an extra table that we needed so that everyone can be seated around the same table. Last night it was snowing, just in time for the holidays!

    December 23, 2014
    • Our tree is up, not much on it, I think having grown up children takes the fun out a bit, no one wants to put the big tree up because no one wants to take it down again. Sounds like a busy time for you and you will be cooking for many.

      December 23, 2014
  32. Thanks for sharing and this place look sad and there is a haunting mood to the photos.

    December 24, 2014
    • I thought the same, I couldn’t help thinking how scared the people arriving there would be.

      December 24, 2014
  33. What an interesting atmosphere you’ve captured – very strong sense of abandonment – fascinating shots.

    December 25, 2014
  34. Les #

    Would love to snoop around in that old place. Good shots!

    December 28, 2014
    • It is amazing that you are allowed to just wander and many of the buildings are open for you to look into. Someone said the buildings you can’t get in are press your nose up against the glass buildings, I thought that was funny. Thank you.

      December 28, 2014
  35. thats awesome – hope the proposed future development isn’t going to erase these treasures?

    December 30, 2014
    • It shouldn’t, I don’t think that would be allowed, it will more likely mean that some of the bushland that we have access to will become basically private land.

      December 30, 2014
      • good to hear. public bushland being converted to private use is happening all over and really hacks me off. a local ‘bushland forever’ (yeah, supposedly protected from development forever) site has been sold for redevelopment and given the green light to be turned into a marina style housing development. check out ‘handsoffpointperon.com’ it’s worth kicking up a fuss if you believe in something!

        December 30, 2014
      • I will check it out, thanks for the link. It is really annoying. I hate it, I think it is misuse of public property and public money, it is criminal.

        December 30, 2014
  36. Amazing. It looks quite similar to the Sydney Quarantine Station, though you can’t walk around it alone unless you’re a hotel guest. Sad, really, since it’s a historic landmark – now with a pricetag.

    December 30, 2014
    • I really hope that doesn’t happen to ours, I think people might jack up if that happened to it. I think many of us are getting sick of crown land or public land being handed over to private investors.
      I imagine they were probably built around the same time, so that is probably why they look similar. You can come and visit ours for free.

      December 30, 2014
  37. I visited there a few years ago and loved the place. There are plans to make it better and tell more stories there, about the people who arrived and stayed before being cleared and allowed to make a new life in Australia… great images, Leanne! 🙂

    December 31, 2014
    • That would be good if they do that, there is lots of stuff there now and many buildings open, which is nice. Thank you.

      December 31, 2014
  38. Awesome! What a great spot and captured beautifully.

    January 1, 2015
    • Thank you, it is a great spot, I am looking forward to going back and spending more time there.

      January 1, 2015
  39. Nicely done!!!!

    January 8, 2015
  40. A fantastic record of images for a significant European heritage site Leanne. Thankfully our new state government will now stop the crude exploitation proposed by the coalition for this National Park.

    January 11, 2015
    • Thank you Denis, glad you liked my images, I do hope to get back sometime. I hadn’t heard that, but I am thankful if that is the case too, it should never have been considered in the first place. I wouldn’t like to see what happened to the Sydney Quarantine Station happen to ours.

      January 11, 2015
  41. Ron #

    Great photos once again. We had a young hedgehog for a short while when we lived in Germany. We found him wandering in the road. He looked like an echidna in many ways. 🙂

    January 18, 2015
    • I think there are lots of similarities, we aren’t allowed to have native animals for pets, but it is great when you find them just going about their business.

      January 18, 2015
  42. This is an interesting post and series of images. Thanks for posting.

    January 24, 2015
    • Glad you think so, thank you.

      January 24, 2015
  43. What an interesting hike you had. I love reading about these kind of places and all the things that go with the outing. Loved the little creature which we don’t get here! and the gorgeous line of trees !

    January 24, 2015
    • It was Jenny, and really worth it. I love places like that too, I do like history and hearing about it. Oh the echidna, very cute, I loved the way it didn’t seem bothered by us and just went on it way. Thank you Jenny.

      January 25, 2015

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