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Weekend Wanderings: Fort Nepean

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Late year I went to the Quarantine Station on Point Nepean, which is down on the entrance to Port Phillip Bay, the Bay that Melbourne is on, and one of the reasons we went there was so we could go to the Point, see where it was.  We had no real idea of what what there, but knew that a World War II fort was there as well.  Depending on which way you go, either just over 2 kilometres on the road, or if you go on the walking track it is longer.  We went the long way, and we were really surprised with what we found.

Fort Nepean was built for the second world war to protect Melbourne, though the war never came this far South and Victoria’s only real involvement was the supply of men to fight to fight in it.  I’m sure there was more to it than that, but that is a simplistic view of it. The fort was an interesting place to explore, besides some good views, it was interesting to see what is underground there.  I was also surprised that it was looked after by Parks Victoria, so entry was free, and you could just roam around it with no one watching you, it was fantastic.  I hope it stays that way.

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It wasn’t a hard walk, a bit of uphill, but worth it really.  There is a bus that runs there every half an hour, but I would recommend walking there, catching the bus back.  You would see views like this on the bus, but you wouldn’t be able to stop and enjoy them.

I was surprised to see Point Lonsdale, you can see it in the photo above, on the horizon to the right.  I think because when I’ve been at Point Lonsdale and looked across it seemed so far away and you couldn’t really make out much, it will be interesting to go back there now that I know what is on the other side.

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Most of the fort structures and rooms were underground, it is hard to know what the rooms were used for, you could still walk into them and see them.  It looks like it was very sterile working conditions, nothing fancy was done here.  The concrete is starting to fall apart, so I don’t know how long it will be before it is decided they are unsafe to enter.

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Above ground were where the guns were, and the bunkers for looking out.  The concrete bunkers can be seen all along here, they are also over on Point Lonsdale.  They were the lookout towers, I guess, situated in all different areas to spot anything coming from any direction.

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This scared the hell of out me. I thought it was a snake as all I saw was the head, then I realized it wasn’t moving like a snake and had legs, a blue tongue lizard.  Sigh of relief.

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It was really extraordinary, and we really didn’t spend enough time there.  We both decided we would like to come back and spend more time there.  I think I explained with the Quarantine Station how we really should’ve left earlier, and we should, we have to get their much earlier next time, spend the whole day there, take our lunch.

Here is a map to help you see where it is:

We wandered around, but didn’t see everything, or read everything, but we saw a lot.  There are lots of signs with descriptions of the place and what happened there.  I tried to photograph some so hopefully they help.  It was a great place to wander around, you would be able to use a tripod there, and the day we went it wasn’t really busy.

I have a gallery and the photos are in the order that I saw everything.  It is very wet here in Melbourne, so won’t be going to far today, I hope you have better luck with the weather where you are.

 

58 Comments
  1. Nice
    Sent from my BlackBerry® wireless handheld from Glo Mobile.

    January 10, 2015
  2. Thanks for sharing your adventure!

    January 10, 2015
    • My pleasure, I hope you enjoyed it.

      January 10, 2015
  3. Reblogged this on Женское бельё и музыка.

    January 10, 2015
  4. Another nice end of the week, Leanne, thanks for sharing it. There are so many reminders out there of the way things were. It’s really important that we preserve and visit them so that our new digital age doesn’t forget, or worse yet distort what really happened. Enjoy your week end. Here in New Jersey, no rain, but plenty of cold!

    January 10, 2015
    • You’re welcome John. I couldn’t agree more, I love that saying if we forget history we are doomed to repeat it, I don’t want to see any more wars like that, actually I would like all wars to stop, I suspect we are going to repeat it and another war is on the way, I hope I am wrong. Nice weather then, cold is good, I like cold, though I have probably never experienced your type of cold. We have lots of rain and humidity to look forward to 😦

      January 10, 2015
  5. Gorgeous pix there Leanne! 🙂

    January 10, 2015
  6. Very interesting Leanne. Not sure I will ever get there but thanks to you, at least I have a picture of it in my head. It is pouring rain here in Alice, too!

    January 10, 2015
    • It is interesting, and I guess an important part of our history. I think we are getting your rain, once its done with you it is coming to us, I see we have more to come. I hope the rain is welcomed and you are enjoying it.

      January 10, 2015
  7. A beautiful and different place! 🙂

    January 10, 2015
    • Oh yes, I am looking forward to photographing it again, especially now that I know what it is like. Thanks Thomas. 😀

      January 10, 2015
  8. surreal

    January 10, 2015
  9. Would love to spend some time roaming that place. Nice documentation, and looking forward to future coverage.

    January 10, 2015
    • It is quite amazing, I would take a tripod with me next time, and maybe go much earlier in the morning. It is fanscinating. Thanks Disperser.

      January 10, 2015
  10. Nice pics, Leanne. #117!

    January 10, 2015
  11. Jackie Saulmon Ramirez #

    Ha ha ha! The lizard would have made me weak in the knees! 🙂

    Love these images.

    January 10, 2015
    • It did that to me, it was right by my feet, I looked down and saw the head, my heart skipped a beat or two. LOL
      Thank you Jackie. 😀

      January 10, 2015
      • Jackie Saulmon Ramirez #

        I visited a friend with cerebral palsy once and we were sitting in his screened in patio. He had a coal black cat and I reached down to touch the cat’s tail… only it wasn’t the cat’s tail, it was a snake. I had never seen my friend move so fast and without his crutches!!! I still laugh at him when I think of it. ❤

        January 10, 2015
      • OMG I’m glad I’m reading that now and not right before I go to sleep, giving me the chills just thinking about it. Was the snake poisonous.

        January 10, 2015
  12. This could be our Fort Rodd hill or Macaulay Point! The structures are exactly the same and I have a few photographs of them too. Great shots.

    January 10, 2015
    • Probably all built from similar specs, there certainly wasn’t a lot of design put into them. Thanks Cybele.

      January 10, 2015
  13. Really informative post Leanne! Nice area to explore and history to remember.

    January 10, 2015
    • Thanks Chris, it is, quite amazing, very stark too.

      January 10, 2015
  14. What an intriguing, fascinating place. Your photos of it are wonderful.

    January 10, 2015
    • It is all that Laura, thank you.

      January 10, 2015
  15. Hi Leanne, I visited Point Nepean on August 5,2014, to commemorate firing the First Shot of WW 1. My grandfather was part of the gun crew which fired across the bow of the Pfalz about five hours after War was declared. A photo of the crew is in the background of your photo file name, ‘point-nepean-fort-coast-melbourne–126’. It’s a great place and two think both World Wars had the first allied shot fired from that Fort is a part of Australian history.

    January 10, 2015
  16. They really put the quarantine out at the furthest piece of land, huh? Makes sense. This is a great place for you, Leanne. You like that history! I’m glad that lizard wasn’t a snake. That must have got your adrenaline pumping. Did you take the photo before or after you knew it wasn’t a snake? I have to laugh at what is a photographer’s first instinct.

    January 10, 2015
    • It really isn’t that far, but at the opening of the bay. It is good, and you are right I do like the history, it is great. I’m so glad too, that would have freaked me out too much. It did. I took it once I realised it was a lizard, I wouldn’t have stuck around if I knew it was a snake.

      January 10, 2015
  17. Wonderful post and nice reliving through history.. Surely, a lot of countries would have similar stories, it is nice, as long as the Govt’s preserve it for posterity.

    January 10, 2015
    • I am sure they do Rajesh, we certainly aren’t the only ones. There are probably places all over the world, of course they use radar and satellites now. Thank you Rajesh.

      January 11, 2015
  18. Reblogged this on LIGHTOFCOUNTRY.

    January 11, 2015
  19. Beautiful shots!!!!

    January 11, 2015
  20. always seeing Your photos I get a restless…I want to go to the places you’ve taken photos. Your photos do the place you photograph justice…traavel fever burns.

    January 11, 2015
    • I know what you mean Ritva, I have the same feeling looking at yours and the blogs of others. Thank you so much, that is lovely to hear.

      January 11, 2015
  21. A fabulous post Leanne – thanks for taking the time. Looks like a really enjoyable day!
    I love informative posts like this… it really is right out on the furthest point!
    Seeing some of this makes me think of one of the Mission Impossible movies – I wonder if they filmed here? (way back now).
    Wonderful descriptive images 😀

    January 11, 2015
    • Thank you Robyn, it was extraordinary, can’t believe it has taken me so long to get there.
      I thought I should start making them more information, and it is good to hear you saying that.
      Oh I don’t know, though others have said they have similar places in other cities, so possibly not here.
      Thanks again Robyn. 😀

      January 11, 2015
  22. A wonderful photo tour.

    January 12, 2015
  23. How ever do you get the time to do all the things that you do? This is a great photo expedition.

    January 12, 2015
    • I don’t have a regular job Emily, this is all I do. That may change if I start teaching and that takes off. Thank you.

      January 12, 2015
  24. Awesome place and it is free entrance fee, it worth a visit especially the old fort it is good for a fashion photo shot…Awesome photos, my friend and enjoying reading the post of this derelict fort.

    January 12, 2015
    • Yes free, you just walk in, the gates to close at night though. That’s true it would be good for that, I think the quarantine station would be as well. Thank you Cattan, that’s great.

      January 12, 2015
  25. Reblogged this on Tracey in Maine.

    January 12, 2015
  26. Nice place..:)

    January 13, 2015
  27. There are so many little places like that are much nicer than the usual ‘touristy’ destinations. I would have enjoyed this very much. 🙂

    January 20, 2015
    • So true, it is quite an interesting place, I hope you get to see it next time you come down. 😀

      January 20, 2015

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