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Up for Discussion: Winter Photography

Recently I put out a call for people who wanted to guest blog.  I like people guest blogging, it means a day I can hand over to someone else, and it means I may learn something new too.  I received an email from John Feist, and his blog John Feist Photography saying he was interested in doing a guest blog on Winter Photography.  I have no experience with this, and if I live in Australia for the rest of my life I will never experience it, so this was an intriguing idea for me.  So today I have a post for you from John.

Winter Photography

by John Feist

Picture_1

Shooting in winter conditions poses a number of challenges that the other seasons do not. Some are physical and others technical. It also creates some beautiful and unique opportunities. The key elements of classic winter shots include harshness, cold, contrast and lack of color.

In winter the photographer needs to understand how to dress in order to stay warm and still be able to move about to capture good images. Remember, snow is water and it can melt into your clothing. Being wet in the cold is no fun. If you are not familiar with being out for extended periods during the winter, read up on it before you go.

Another temperature related concern is your equipment’s operating temperature range. In most cases, temperature is not a concern. However, if you will be working in temperatures below 0F (or -18C) some equipment may run into issues as well. Check your gear’s documentation for details.

Snow is one of the elements we want to photograph. Remember that it covers everything. This means if you don’t know the area where you will be shooting, you need to be aware that the snow may be covering thin ice on streams, lakes, depressions and many other hazards.

When it comes to actually making images, all of the rules for good photography apply. There are some “gotchas” that need special attention. The biggest concern is white balance. Shooting in the snow throws the sensors off because there is so much white. Snow is also very bright compared to most of the rest of your shot. Normally the white balance needs to be well into the blue (cool) end of the range, rarely over 6,000. Try a couple of test shots to get your white balance. It’s a lot easier to have the camera capture good white than to have to remove blue from your snow in post processing.

Consider applying a couple of stops of exposure compensation as well. This also helps to offset the preponderance of shades of white in the snow. Again, a couple of test shots can save a lot of post processing time.

Shooting in bright sunshine in the middle of the day is always a challenge. In the snow it is even worse. If you’re going to be out in those conditions, have good sunglasses for both yourself and your camera! In bright sun use the lowest ISO setting you can. Obviously, you will be working with fast shutter speeds and probably smaller apertures. This is a good time to use your neutral density and polaroid filters. They allow you to get longer exposures and give you the flexibility to change your depth of field as needed.

It is better to under expose than over expose. You can bring out details from the underexposed areas, but those areas where everything is burned out are lost. By contrast, gold and blue light in winter can be spectacular. The image at the top of this post was taken about half way through golden light.

Winter is also a great time for some other techniques. With all the differing textures in the snow, long exposures can yield stunning results… another good use for your neutral density and polaroid filters! Be sure your tripod is on a steady base and that you are not dealing with wind that can shake your camera or even knock it over!

Picture_2

Winter, at least in my experience, tends to have lots of overcast days. That means lots of flat light that yields soft images. This can either be challenging when it comes to the sky, or result in some interesting skies with subtle shading and transitions.

Picture_3

Outside of gold and blue light, winter shots tend to have a limited amount of color. Taking your images into black and white is a great way to convey the stark harshness of the winter scene.

Snow gets blown around pretty easily, and can settle into some unexpected and unusual patterns. As with all photography, it is essential to keep an eye out for these. Remember, even here, the angles make a big difference.

Snow has an interesting cousin. Ice is another component of winter photography that produces beautiful images. Ice can extend your view, create interesting patterns and reflections as well as help to convey the cold environment in which you made the image.

I know a lot of people who think of winter and wildlife as mutually incompatible. Nothing can be farther from the truth. Yes many animals hibernate or migrate with the seasons. Those that remain have a variety of survival mechanisms and techniques that make them wonderful subjects. You will need a long lens and some kind of “hiding place” to get good shots as there isn’t as much natural cover available.

The bottom line on winter photography is that it has its challenges, but with a little understanding and preparation, it can yield truly beautiful images.

I live in central New Jersey (U.S.A.). This year, we’ve been “blessed” with great conditions for winter photography. I’ve been shooting for most of my life, starting back in the film days. I got serious a about my photography a few years ago. My go to camera is a Nikon D7000 with a Nikor FX 28-300 lens. For longer shots I use a Sigma 150-500. The camera sits on a 3 Legged Thing which is light enough to carry around all day, sturdy and flexible enough to shoot in a wide variety of conditions.

You can see more of my work on my website, http://JohnFeistPhotography.com. I also have a Facebook page and blog of the same name. love hearing from other photographers. Just drop me a note to info@JohnFeistPhotography.com.

When I’m not working to support my photography or doing things photographic, I also teach yoga and make some of the best oatmeal cookies around.

Finally, I want to thank Leanne for allowing me to be a guest on her blog. One of America’s iconic artists, Norman Rockwell, used to tell people that he painted winter pictures in the summer and summer pictures in the winter. His rationale being that this way he felt cooler in summer and warmer in winter. I suspect Leanne had a similar reaction when I proposed this subject!

Thank you

I would also like to say thanks to John for preparing this post for us.  I don’t know if I will ever use this information, as I rarely see snow, but I am sure many of you will get a lot out of it.  I am amazed at how difficult it seems to shoot in the snow, quite incredible. John also sent extra photos, so I thought I would put the above ones and the extras in a gallery for you now.  John is also going to answer questions, and comments, which is lucky, I wouldn’t know how to help anyone.  Thanks again John.

Don’t forget if you are interested in doing a guest post send me an email, leanne@leannecole.com.au

98 Comments
  1. Despite what you may have heard in the news about snow in the eastern US, we just had our first real snow here in Tennessee in a few years. About five inches of fluffy white on the lawn. I was up and out shortly after sunrise so I could get photos of the snow still on the trees. Accidentally captured a red fox in one photo. Dress warmly and winter photography is like no other season–but that is true of each season.

    February 27, 2015
    • You have summed it up perfectly! Each season has its own special characteristics. As you mentioned, the biggest challenge in winter is keeping warm. I’d lvoe to see your red fox.

      February 27, 2015
  2. Thank you! I have been trying to motivate myself to get out and take some winter pictures. I really appreciate all of the tips. The pictures are beautiful! Thanks Leanne for sharing your blog.

    February 27, 2015
    • YOu’re welcome, it is a good thing to do I think.

      February 27, 2015
    • Most of what I know about photography came from others sharing what they know. I’m always happy to share what little I know. Thank you for the kind words about my images.

      Now you have the information, and hopefully the motivation, so good luck in capturing some great images.

      February 27, 2015
  3. Excellent guest post!

    February 27, 2015
    • Thank you. I was thrilled when Leanne wanted me to do a guest blog on this. While I love to write, it’s always a challenge as to how it will be received. I’m very grateful for the kind comments.

      February 27, 2015
    • I agree! Great idea!

      February 27, 2015
  4. I’m no photographer, just a happy amateur snapper with an average camera, not a DSLR, but I have an appreciation for what you guys produce. We never have snow either (apart from in the hills on telephoto), and like you Leanne, really enjoyed the imagery captured.

    February 27, 2015
    • Thank you Uncle Spike. Don’t sell yourself short. The camera is only a tool. You the photographer are the artist who uses the tool. I’ve seen some of the most amazing images captured on phones, point and shoot and similar cameras. The important thing is to grow and perfect your craft.

      By the way, I love your icon photo.

      February 27, 2015
      • Haha, thanks John. WordPress has been my inspiration, with many great photographers sharing their craft; so much so that I think about my shots in terms of how well they will be received on my blog posts 🙂

        February 27, 2015
  5. Great post, which will be useful for me one day. I’ve been longing for some decent snow here in Paris for two years now 😦

    February 27, 2015
    • Thank you Henrietta. Paris is one of my favorite places anywhere. When you get the next snow, bundle up and get out early. There are several reasons for that. First shooting while it is snowing, especially in a big city, offers some very unique perspectives. Next People tend to stay indoors during a storm or right after it so you can get those great long shots of the streets, buildings, etc. And finally, in any city after a day or two, the snow (how shall I say this nicely…) begins to change color.

      When taking snow shots in Paris, you get the best of both worlds. You have the incredible parks where you can get nature. You also have a city that was made for urban/street photography. For the later you might get some really neat shots of people dealing with the snow. Bon Chance!

      February 27, 2015
  6. Jackie Saulmon Ramirez #

    I never would have thought of some of those things to consider like thin ice being under the snow.

    February 27, 2015
    • Jackie, I’ve learned some of these lessons the hard way. Depending on the conditions and location getting really wet or injured in the winter can be anything from a bit of a nuisance to a life threatening event. I hope that you never have to experience any part of that spectrum.

      Thank you for allowing more folks to read this posting by reblogging it.

      February 27, 2015
  7. Jackie Saulmon Ramirez #

    Reblogged this on The Artistic Spider's Web and commented:
    Up for Discussion: Winter Photography
    by Leanne Cole on February 27, 2015

    February 27, 2015
  8. Jos #

    This is an excellent post, full of useful tips and information and beautiful photography. Thank you John and Leanne, I shall look into your website John.

    February 27, 2015
    • Thank you Jos for the kind words. If I’ve been able to help you grow your craft, I’m thrilled. I hope you like what you see on my website. It is one of those things that I am forever behind when it comes to updates!

      February 27, 2015
  9. Great guest post! Thank you for all the helpful advice about shooting in the snow with all that white and the flat light. Cardinals are such a joy in winter in particular and they do contribute a delightful pop of colour in otherwise monchrome images.

    February 27, 2015
    • Thank you Laura. I hope that some of what I wrote can help you create better images.

      We love the cardinals too. Truth be told, I keep the bird feeders going all year. Part of that is to give them something to eat. The ulterior motive is to make sure I have plenty of birds to photograph during the winter.

      February 27, 2015
      • I feed the birds all year too. I love to have a morning cup of tea watching all the feathered visitors.

        February 27, 2015
  10. Very good post (from someone who is all too familiar with winter work) – one thing when your dealing with lots of snow…bulk up on energy bars to keep you going – it’s a lot of work just to get from point a to point b.

    February 27, 2015
    • Thank you Robert. Yes winter burns a lot of calories and energy bars can make a big difference. I know a number people who advocate a more “spirited” liquid fuel. By the end of the day some of their shots get really interesting!

      February 27, 2015
  11. You have to use a spot meter and take your reading on the brightest part in the picture. You can adjust the rest in post processing. As someone who has had nothing BUT snow to photograph for quite a while, I can assure you it works. NOTHING else works. If you don’t expose for the brightest place, you lose the detail in the highlights.

    February 27, 2015
  12. Great post!

    I’ve been bumbling my way along all winter trying to learn this stuff.

    February 27, 2015
    • I hope I was able to make that path a little easier for you Chris. It has been my experience that when I get stuck and nothing I try gets me moving again, one small insight is all it takes for me to figure out the rest. Please feel free to email me if I might be able to help further.

      February 27, 2015
  13. Very interesting post. ALMOST makes me want to move back to Ohio! But not quite. I love the idea of working on cool subjects in hot weather, and vice versa. Thanks Leanne and John!

    February 27, 2015
    • Thank you for the kind comments. You might want to consider a visit some time in January or February. Over the last few years it’s been the closet thing to a guarantee you can get from the weather that there will be plenty of snow. Once you’ve done it you’ll have lots of great winter pictures to help cool off whenever the weather in your new locale gets too hot!

      February 27, 2015
  14. Thanks Leanne and John, this is a wonderful post! Creative and informative.

    February 27, 2015
    • Thank you Robyn. I was hoping to hit at least a bit on both counts. I’m glad you enjoyed it.

      February 27, 2015
  15. Thanks Leanne and John, very informative and thought provoking. being based in Australia I had never considered the effects of snow on photography! But there is food for thought re the intense reflections in images taken in the ocean. Chris

    February 27, 2015
    • Thanks for the wonderful feedback Chris. It’s amazing how many of the techniques that apply to working in one type of condition can apply to others. White sand and snow have a lot in common (optically speaking!). After all, snow and ice are just other presentations of water! As Marilyn pointed out in a comment above, getting your exposure settings based on the brightest part of the image is crucial. What I find to be very useful when working in bright conditions is to do some form of bracketing to make sure that the entire available dynamic range is captured.

      February 27, 2015
  16. A useful and interesting post. Thank you.

    February 27, 2015
  17. Beautiful shots and beneficial tips. We don’t have huge amounts of show here in Northern Virginia, but we do get some and I love to go out in it once the roads have been cleared a bit. It’s always fascinating to see which creatures overwinter with us. I mostly try to photograph wildlife, but you winter landscapes may inspire me to try to capture the big picture more, rather than try to zoom in close as I am wont to do most of the time.

    February 27, 2015
    • Mike, Thank you for the kind feedback. I’ve spent some time in northern VA and yes you can get some big storms there. You are fortunate that there are so many diverse photo opportunities close by.

      I am thrilled that my post and images have gotten you looking to broaden your your photographic skill set. It can take a little practice going from one genre to another. Stick with it and you’ll love the results.

      February 27, 2015
  18. Living in the North West of the US, I have more shoots with snow than without. It’s true that it can be harsh, but it can also be incredibly soft. To me, there are few things on Earth more beautiful than a fresh snow. It will often cover the obstructions you normally have to fight out of the frame, and it almost always leaves the world feeling fresh, new and exciting.

    February 27, 2015
    • You are absolutely correct. I often think that snow is nature’s way of white washing the landscape. I often go out either during the storm or just as it’s finished to take advantage of the pristine landscape…nothing like it.

      February 27, 2015
  19. Di' #

    Just what I need! I bought my DSLR camera last summer and this winter is the 1st winter that I try out my camera. I’ve had lots of practices so far since this year winter is abundant with snow. I had my frustration and it was really hard trying to shoot in winter with the snow all around. So thanks John for your post and Leanne for introducing John. Take care.

    February 27, 2015
    • Di, If anything I wrote helps you to enjoy your photo experiences more, I’m delighted. I hope that you are enjoying your DSLR. Remember, the best way to take good pictures is to take lots of pictures. Learning what it takes to get great shots is like learning to drive a car. You can read all about it, but until you are in the driver’s seat you don’t know what it’s really all about. Happy shooting!

      February 27, 2015
  20. Beautiful photos.

    February 27, 2015
    • Thank you, I’m glad you like them. I definitely enjoyed creating them.

      February 27, 2015
  21. Living in Melbourne, Australia it is hard to get such as stunning shots as John did since we dont have snow (not at least on the city or close). Once I was on Boston for winter and even when a lot of people was saying that it wasn’t cold enough, for me it was simply freezing and didn’t want to spend sometime outdoors taking shots but after seeing this amazing post, it is definitively something that I would try if I have the chance again.

    February 27, 2015
    • Thank you Victor. Your comments brought me a smile. Boston is one of my favorite cities, I love shooting there. Over the years I’ve learned that the experience of cold (or hot) is relative. I went to college where winter temperatures were regularly -20F or colder. When we would come home to the New York City area and people were complaining about the cold (15F) we would just smile and chuckle!

      I hope you do get the opportunity for winter/snow shots. It really can be fun.

      Leanne, from some of the comments I’m seeing you may need to organize an expedition to somewhere cold so that you and your fellow Australians can get your own snow shots!

      February 27, 2015
  22. Very interesting post. And informative. And beautiful. I’m now living in Abu Dhabi, and today it got down to a frigid 70 degrees F. (21C). Brrr. But sometimes a desert can remind you of snow. And maybe you can use some of John’s tips.

    February 27, 2015
    • You make a very good point. One big difference between snow and desert (aside from temperature) is that you need to be very careful changing lenses and so forth as there can be a lot of dust that you definitely don’t want in your gear.

      Some of the most incredible landscape images I’ve seen were made in the desert, so yes, I hope you do get the opportunity to photograph in that environment.

      I seem to recall that in at least one of the emirates they built an indoor ski hill at a mall. You might find that to be a very interesting place to get some unique snow captures!

      February 27, 2015
  23. TPJ #

    Great post, thank you. Living in New England I shot in the snow all the time. The best part for me is there are no leaves to hide the birds. Even the Eagles can be found.

    February 27, 2015
    • Thank you TPJ. Yes you’ve gotten just a bit of snow this year! Eagles make incredible subjects, I’m glad you were able to capture those images.

      This year, more than most, offers some unique opportunities due to the sheer volume of snow. I suspect that like Boston, New England cities and towns look more like a maze where folks have to navigate between walls of snow. Those shots can be fun and awesome!

      February 27, 2015
  24. Lovely photos! Is it enough to use the camera’s “snow” setting, or is it necessary to make more adjustments? I have just one snow photo on my blog: https://forelysium.wordpress.com/2015/02/09/dabbling/

    February 27, 2015
    • Katie, that’s a lovely shot on your blog. I didn’t get a chance to read much but I’ll go back to it.

      One of the first lessons I learned when I got serious about photography was to abandon the “auto” modes on my camera. I normally shoot in either aperture priority or full manual. With a little practice the differences, usually for the better, are visible.

      Let’s stick with aperture mode. The idea behind this is that the aperture (F stop) determines how much depth or depth of field (DOF) your image will have. The smaller the number, the bigger your lens opening and the less depth of field you get. As the numbers go up, the lens closes down and the DOF increases.

      When I was learning how to work this, I would take lots of pictures of the same thing, making small changes between them. In aperture mode that would mean changing that setting to see what difference it made. Individual steps are not always obvious, but going from say 3.5 to 8 should be very noticeable.

      Go ahead and try it, or as I like to call it…play. Fell free to drop me a note form time to time if you have questions.

      February 27, 2015
  25. Great guest post, and beautiful winter photos! I used to take quite many pictures in the winter when we lived up north, kind of miss that opportunity here in FL – with the good and the bad 🙂

    February 27, 2015
    • Thank you Tiny. There have been many times this winter when I would have gladly traded places with you! You did have a number of opportunities for snow shots closer to home this winter. When in doubt, snow country is just a three to four hour flight away. You could take a long week end, get your fill of snow shots and remember why you moved to Florida!

      February 27, 2015
  26. Gorgeous shots..i love how surreal winter landscapes are..and yes rural vic never have sbow here….dry and dusty..:)

    February 27, 2015
    • Thank you! I’m thrilled that you like my work. Dry and dusty can pose some challenges, but also yield terrific results. Just look at the wonderful images Leanne posts.

      February 27, 2015
  27. Thank you for much for bringing up this discussion John! I found this post very informative. Although I don’t live in a place where there will be snowing, I still found this post very interesting and enjoyable. Those pictures are incredibly stunning also! ❤ Moreover, I definitely have to thank Leanne for allowing John to do this guest post! 😉 Otherwise, we wouldn't be able to enjoy this post on your blog. Both of you are awesome 🙂 Keep taking beautiful pictures and keep inspiring!!! ❤

    February 27, 2015
    • Thank you so much for your kind words. I’m so happy that you enjoyed my posting and the images with it. If anything I said helps you in your photography, I’m twice happy. Maybe one day you will find yourself with the opportunity to shoot in show…you never know!

      February 27, 2015
  28. Beautiful pictures!

    February 27, 2015
    • Thank you Luke. You have some wonderful images on your site. As you continue your travels I suspect it’s just a matter of time before you are deep in snow country. Keep taking those wonderful pictures.

      February 27, 2015
  29. Thank you so much for this guest post, Leanne! These tips will be so helpful, since I’ve had trouble taking decent winter photos, especially in snow. Beautiful pictures, John, and thanks for the pointers!

    February 28, 2015
    • Thank you for the kind words Becky. Getting the snow shots can be a bit tricky. Stick with it and before you know it you’ll have wonderful shots.

      March 1, 2015
  30. Thank you for these pointers! I will try to apply them. This year I have been trying to enjoy NJ’s above-average snowfall through photography, where otherwise it just makes me grumpy lol. I love your images and advice. What a thrill to see cardinals’ beautiful colors pop out from a dull winter background 🙂

    February 28, 2015
    • Thank you Cynthia. We have lots of places for great snow shots in NJ…and lots of snow to photograph! I’m not sure if I should say fortunately or unfortunately, we are starting to run out of time to get snow shots as, believe it or not, spring will be here before you know it. Good luck in getting great shots and staying “ungrumpy”!

      March 1, 2015
  31. Absolutely beautiful work. I really do love a winter wonderland and those birds are gorgeous. We had no snow this year 😦

    February 28, 2015
    • Thank you for the kind words. I’m way behind on updating my site, including bunches of winter shots. Sorry to hear that you were “snow deprived” this year. We would have been glad to share with you!

      March 1, 2015
  32. PS: I’ve bookmarked his site!

    February 28, 2015
  33. Australia seems like a wonderful place to visit. I had to “GOOGLE” Yackandanda to discover out where that was. Your photos were wild !!!

    February 28, 2015
    • It is a great place, I love leaving here, oh, I was meant to put in a map and I forgot all about it. sorry. Glad you liked the photos, and great that you googled it.

      February 28, 2015
  34. These pictures are gorgeous, and John has a really lovely way of writing, it felt like he was talking out aloud to us. I’ve always wondered what it’s like to take pictures in the snow and ice, as we don’t have such conditions in my country… or at least not very often!

    February 28, 2015
    • Thank you Reggie. Obviously, it’s hard to take winter snow and ice pictures when there’s none around. Perhaps one day you’ll be able to travel to some places where snow and ice abound. This kind of photography can be very rewarding as the winter landscapes are so different from the rest of the year.

      March 1, 2015
  35. Beautiful winter images!

    March 2, 2015
    • Thank you Elizabeth. You certainly have lots of opportunities for winter shots on the Cape this year. I suspect by now you wish you were shooting spring stuff!

      March 2, 2015
  36. A big THANK YOU to both you (Leanne) and John for this post. I love pictures of winter, since we don’t have much of one in Florida, and I had never even thought of the challenges that were mentioned. John, your pictures, almost make me want to go up North in the snow…almost 🙂 Beautiful!

    March 2, 2015
    • Thank you Kristen. You have some wonderful images on your site. This year, you wouldn’t even need to go very far north to see winter! From what I’ve been reading and seeing, they’ve had snow in the Carolinas and Georgia. If you go to one of those places when it snows you also get the comedic side show watching them try to clear the snow!

      March 2, 2015
      • Thank you, John. I’ve heard that clearing the snow has been nigh to impossible this winter 🙂

        March 2, 2015
  37. Hi Leanne! Here’s something you won’t see in your native land: https://mylifelivedfull.wordpress.com/2015/02/11/a-winter-day-at-the-falls/
    Photos taken by my blogging buddy, Joanne.
    ~Carol

    March 2, 2015
    • You are so right Carol, we never see anything like that here. I read the bit about the cold, and even that, I don’t think I have any concept of. thanks for sending it.

      March 2, 2015
    • Carol, your friend is very right about the magic of the frozen mist. The falls provide a very unique perspective on that as the river there almost never freezes completely. The northern parts of New York (state) are always a great place for winter photography because it’s always cold, and usually quite snowy.

      March 3, 2015
      • Hi John, thanks for weighing in. I thought Joanne’s photographs were quite magical.

        March 3, 2015
  38. Reblogged this on Skinny Goat Photography.

    March 3, 2015
  39. These photos are so amazing, that they take away the cold, and only leave the beauty. I always enjoy your photos, and thank you for visiting my pages.

    March 8, 2015
    • Thank you for the kind words about my images. If they bring you joy, then you have made my day. We are finally, I hope, coming out of a long cold winter. I suspect that in a few months we’ll be looking at some of these images to help us cool off!

      You have a very interesting site with some interesting thoughts along the way. I love being able to read how others see, view and react with this ever shrinking world.

      March 9, 2015
  40. id love you to us eone of my blogs a syour guest blog…

    March 9, 2015
    • You would need to write something specifically for the blog, apparently Google doesn’t like double ups, but if you are interested send me an email.

      March 9, 2015
  41. great photos and advise!

    March 12, 2015
    • Thank you Claire. I hope that you are able to get some great winter captures and that some of my tips can help.

      March 12, 2015
  42. You managed to capture so much life, in a lifeless season. Beautiful!

    March 26, 2015
    • Thank you, winter here is the best time to take photos, well I think it is.

      March 26, 2015
      • Every season has something special about it. Right now, I’m looking forward to spring blossoms 🙂

        March 26, 2015
      • I think so too, it is great photographing the same place over and over. I’m looking forward to autumn colours.

        March 26, 2015
      • Autumn is so colorful and beautiful! I made a few paintings last autumn, as every new place I’ve been to, inspired me to be combine the colors, to imitate the leaves. ❤

        March 26, 2015
      • It is, last year it happened all over the place, or didn’t seem to happen, but it is definitely on this year. sounds great, I have painted for a few years now. Sounds wonderful Lucy.

        March 26, 2015
      • Always nice to meet other talented painters! I love to paint, especially when the environment inspires me. Very relaxing and beautiful.

        March 26, 2015
      • Oh I wouldn’t call me talented, but I used to enjoy it. I gave it up to concentrate on photography, I like that, no mess to clean up at the end.

        March 26, 2015
    • Thank you Lucy for the the kind comment about my images. I’m glad that you enjoyed them. I think that there is unique beauty to be captured in every season. The hard part is being open to see it. The only painting for which I have any talent involves rollers and walls, so I try to express my art in my photography.

      March 26, 2015
      • I can’t agree more. Beauty is in everything around us, it’s up to us to see it. Photography is definitely a form of art! I’m not such a good photographer, but I do love to immortalize anything beautiful, and I also love to paint and work with my hands. I don’t master any of these skills, but they are for sure relaxing! Have a lovely evening! 🙂

        March 27, 2015

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